Effect of particulates on virus survival in seawater

Charles P Gerba, G. E. Schaiberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This investigation attempted to determine the role of particulate matter in the survival of E. coli B B bacteriophage T2 in seawater. Viral survival studies in natural seawater that had been passed through membrane filters of various porosities or differentially centrifuged indicated that there are at least two classes of particulates naturally present in seawater affecting loss of viral titer. One seemed to promote viral survival, while the other was antagonistic to survival. Kaolinite, a clay mineral, was shown to encourage the persistence of virus in seawater. The virus was shown to adsorb readily to kaolinite in seawater, with deadsorption occurring in the presence of organic matter and in solutions with low salt concentration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-103
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the Water Pollution Control Federation
Volume47
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1975
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Viruses
Seawater
Kaolinite
Bacteriophages
Clay minerals
Biological materials
Escherichia coli
Porosity
Salts
Membranes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution

Cite this

Effect of particulates on virus survival in seawater. / Gerba, Charles P; Schaiberger, G. E.

In: Journal of the Water Pollution Control Federation, Vol. 47, No. 1, 01.1975, p. 93-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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