Effect of thermal loading on compressional wave velocity, Mode I fracture toughness and tensile strength

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Thermal loading can impact the mechanical properties of rock. In deep excavations, for example, ventilation can result in a significant rapid cooling of the rock. In this study sandstone samples were subjected to slow heating followed by rapid cooling, referred to as thermal shock. An initial suite of tests were conducted at temperatures of 100°C, 200°C, and 300°C. In these tests, samples were subjected to a single cycle of heating and cooling and then tested. Measurements included P and S wave velocity, fracture toughness and tensile strength. Even though only small changes were seen at 100°C, further studies were conducted at this temperature because of the practical importance of this temperature range in mining and civil design. Cyclic heating and cooling was conducted at 100°C, with measurements of fracture toughness and tensile strength at 10, 15 and 20 cycles. Even though the overall results from the tree types of measurements (seismic velocity, fracture toughness, and tensile strength) are quite complicated, they can be at least partially explained by considering three types of crack density changes: a small decrease in crack density (crack healing), a small increase in crack density (blunting of macrocracks), and a large increase in crack density (rock damage).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication42nd U.S. Rock Mechanics - 2nd U.S.-Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium
StatePublished - 2008
Event42nd U.S. Rock Mechanics - 2nd U.S.-Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium 2008 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Jun 29 2008Jul 2 2008

Other

Other42nd U.S. Rock Mechanics - 2nd U.S.-Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium 2008
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period6/29/087/2/08

Fingerprint

fracture toughness
fracture strength
tensile strength
wave velocity
Fracture toughness
crack
Tensile strength
cracks
Cracks
Cooling
cooling
Rocks
rocks
heating
Heating
rock
cycles
excavation
thermal shock
temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics

Cite this

Effect of thermal loading on compressional wave velocity, Mode I fracture toughness and tensile strength. / Kim, Kwangmin; Kemeny, John M.

42nd U.S. Rock Mechanics - 2nd U.S.-Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium. 2008.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kim, K & Kemeny, JM 2008, Effect of thermal loading on compressional wave velocity, Mode I fracture toughness and tensile strength. in 42nd U.S. Rock Mechanics - 2nd U.S.-Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium. 42nd U.S. Rock Mechanics - 2nd U.S.-Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium 2008, San Francisco, CA, United States, 6/29/08.
Kim K, Kemeny JM. Effect of thermal loading on compressional wave velocity, Mode I fracture toughness and tensile strength. In 42nd U.S. Rock Mechanics - 2nd U.S.-Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium. 2008
@inproceedings{77af654473144c3386de33d27f039940,
title = "Effect of thermal loading on compressional wave velocity, Mode I fracture toughness and tensile strength",
abstract = "Thermal loading can impact the mechanical properties of rock. In deep excavations, for example, ventilation can result in a significant rapid cooling of the rock. In this study sandstone samples were subjected to slow heating followed by rapid cooling, referred to as thermal shock. An initial suite of tests were conducted at temperatures of 100°C, 200°C, and 300°C. In these tests, samples were subjected to a single cycle of heating and cooling and then tested. Measurements included P and S wave velocity, fracture toughness and tensile strength. Even though only small changes were seen at 100°C, further studies were conducted at this temperature because of the practical importance of this temperature range in mining and civil design. Cyclic heating and cooling was conducted at 100°C, with measurements of fracture toughness and tensile strength at 10, 15 and 20 cycles. Even though the overall results from the tree types of measurements (seismic velocity, fracture toughness, and tensile strength) are quite complicated, they can be at least partially explained by considering three types of crack density changes: a small decrease in crack density (crack healing), a small increase in crack density (blunting of macrocracks), and a large increase in crack density (rock damage).",
author = "Kwangmin Kim and Kemeny, {John M}",
year = "2008",
language = "English (US)",
booktitle = "42nd U.S. Rock Mechanics - 2nd U.S.-Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Effect of thermal loading on compressional wave velocity, Mode I fracture toughness and tensile strength

AU - Kim, Kwangmin

AU - Kemeny, John M

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Thermal loading can impact the mechanical properties of rock. In deep excavations, for example, ventilation can result in a significant rapid cooling of the rock. In this study sandstone samples were subjected to slow heating followed by rapid cooling, referred to as thermal shock. An initial suite of tests were conducted at temperatures of 100°C, 200°C, and 300°C. In these tests, samples were subjected to a single cycle of heating and cooling and then tested. Measurements included P and S wave velocity, fracture toughness and tensile strength. Even though only small changes were seen at 100°C, further studies were conducted at this temperature because of the practical importance of this temperature range in mining and civil design. Cyclic heating and cooling was conducted at 100°C, with measurements of fracture toughness and tensile strength at 10, 15 and 20 cycles. Even though the overall results from the tree types of measurements (seismic velocity, fracture toughness, and tensile strength) are quite complicated, they can be at least partially explained by considering three types of crack density changes: a small decrease in crack density (crack healing), a small increase in crack density (blunting of macrocracks), and a large increase in crack density (rock damage).

AB - Thermal loading can impact the mechanical properties of rock. In deep excavations, for example, ventilation can result in a significant rapid cooling of the rock. In this study sandstone samples were subjected to slow heating followed by rapid cooling, referred to as thermal shock. An initial suite of tests were conducted at temperatures of 100°C, 200°C, and 300°C. In these tests, samples were subjected to a single cycle of heating and cooling and then tested. Measurements included P and S wave velocity, fracture toughness and tensile strength. Even though only small changes were seen at 100°C, further studies were conducted at this temperature because of the practical importance of this temperature range in mining and civil design. Cyclic heating and cooling was conducted at 100°C, with measurements of fracture toughness and tensile strength at 10, 15 and 20 cycles. Even though the overall results from the tree types of measurements (seismic velocity, fracture toughness, and tensile strength) are quite complicated, they can be at least partially explained by considering three types of crack density changes: a small decrease in crack density (crack healing), a small increase in crack density (blunting of macrocracks), and a large increase in crack density (rock damage).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=69549120319&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=69549120319&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:69549120319

BT - 42nd U.S. Rock Mechanics - 2nd U.S.-Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium

ER -