Effects of a carrot juice intervention on plasma carotenoids, oxidative stress, and inflammation in overweight breast cancer survivors.

Amy C. Butalla, Tracy E. Crane, Bhimanagouda Patil, Betsy C. Wertheim, Patricia Thompson, Cynthia A. Thomson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Evidence suggests that higher plasma carotenoid concentrations are protective in relation to breast cancer recurrence. This simple randomized carrot juice intervention study was designed to test the hypothesis that daily intake of 8 ounces of fresh BetaSweet (anthocyanin-rich) or Balero orange carrot juice would increase plasma total carotenoid concentrations to levels previously shown to be associated with reduced breast cancer recurrence. It was hypothesized that regular carrot juice intake would be associated with reductions in oxidative stress (8-iso-PGF2α) and inflammation (thromboxane B2, prostaglandin E2 metabolites, and hsC-reactive protein). Sixty-nine overweight breast cancer survivors consumed fresh carrot juice made from study-provided carrots for 3 wk. Total plasma carotenoids increased by 1.65 and 1.38 umol/L for the BetaSweet and Balero carrot juice, respectively. Rise in total plasma carotenoids for the overall sample was inversely associated with 8-iso-PGFα (OR: 0.13; 95% CI: 0.20 to 0.75; no differences were shown by carrot variety. These results suggest daily intake of fresh carrot juice is a simple and effective approach to increasing plasma total carotenoids and in turn reducing oxidative stress, but not inflammatory markers, in women previously treated for breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-341
Number of pages11
JournalNutrition and cancer
Volume64
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Oncology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Cancer Research

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