Effects of artificially imposed shade on a Sonoran Desert ecosystem: microclimate and vegetation.

S. D. Smith, D. T. Patten, R. K. Monson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Shading resulted in a cooler, moister microhabitat below and behind each structure. Open gaps between structures exhibited moister soils relative to a control. Ephemeral plants increased in species diversity and showed a shift in species composition in shaded microsites, but exhibited decreased total biomass relative to controls. A deciduous shrub, Ambrosia deltoidea, had more mesophytic leaves, higher leaf area, CO2 assimilation and growth in shaded microsites. An evergreen shrub, Larrea tridentata, had highest CO2 assimilation and growth in sunny microsites. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-82
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Arid Environments
Volume13
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Earth-Surface Processes

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