Effects of bacterial DNA on cytokine production by (NZB/NZW)F1 mice

Gary S. Gilkeson, Jacqueline Conover, Melissa D Halpern, David S. Pisetsky, Amy Feagin, Dennis M. Klinman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microbial DNA has multiple immune effects including the Capacity to induce polyclonal B cell activation and cytokine production in normal mice. We recently described the accelerated induction of anti-DNA Abs in NZB/NZW mice immunized with Escherichia coli (EC) dsDNA; paradoxically these mice developed less renal disease than unimmunized mice or mice immunized with calf thymus DNA. We postulated that alterations in cytokine production induced by bacterial DNA may play a key role in renal protection. To determine the effect of bacterial DNA on cytokine production in NZB/NZW mice, we measured the serum cytokine levels, cell culture supernatant cytokine levels, and number of cytokine-producing splenocytes in NZB/NZW mice injected with EC DNA, calf thymus DNA, or an immune active oligonucleotide. There was a 10- to 25-fold increase in the number of cells secreting IFN-γ compared with IL-4 in mice immunized with EC DNA. IL-12-secreting cells were also increased by bacterial DNA immunization. In parallel with the increase in IFN-γ secreting cells, there was a significant rise in serum IFN-γ levels in mice receiving EC DNA. These results indicate that EC DNA modulates systemic cytokine levels in NZB/NZW mice, selectively increasing IL-12 and IFN-γ while decreasing IL-4 production. The cytokine response of NZB/NZW mice to bacterial DNA may be of significance in disease pathogenesis and relevant to the treatment of lupus-like disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3890-3895
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume161
Issue number8
StatePublished - Oct 15 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Bacterial DNA
Inbred NZB Mouse
Cytokines
Escherichia coli
DNA
Interleukin-12
Interleukin-4
Kidney
Serum
Oligonucleotides
Immunization
B-Lymphocytes
Cell Culture Techniques
Cell Count

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Gilkeson, G. S., Conover, J., Halpern, M. D., Pisetsky, D. S., Feagin, A., & Klinman, D. M. (1998). Effects of bacterial DNA on cytokine production by (NZB/NZW)F1 mice. Journal of Immunology, 161(8), 3890-3895.

Effects of bacterial DNA on cytokine production by (NZB/NZW)F1 mice. / Gilkeson, Gary S.; Conover, Jacqueline; Halpern, Melissa D; Pisetsky, David S.; Feagin, Amy; Klinman, Dennis M.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 161, No. 8, 15.10.1998, p. 3890-3895.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gilkeson, GS, Conover, J, Halpern, MD, Pisetsky, DS, Feagin, A & Klinman, DM 1998, 'Effects of bacterial DNA on cytokine production by (NZB/NZW)F1 mice', Journal of Immunology, vol. 161, no. 8, pp. 3890-3895.
Gilkeson GS, Conover J, Halpern MD, Pisetsky DS, Feagin A, Klinman DM. Effects of bacterial DNA on cytokine production by (NZB/NZW)F1 mice. Journal of Immunology. 1998 Oct 15;161(8):3890-3895.
Gilkeson, Gary S. ; Conover, Jacqueline ; Halpern, Melissa D ; Pisetsky, David S. ; Feagin, Amy ; Klinman, Dennis M. / Effects of bacterial DNA on cytokine production by (NZB/NZW)F1 mice. In: Journal of Immunology. 1998 ; Vol. 161, No. 8. pp. 3890-3895.
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