Effects of chronic, moderate endurance running on body composition and cardiac structure in women

R. Marsh, D. Lapan, Steven Goldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of chronic endurance running on cardiac structure and function were studied in 12 young women. Initially subjects ran 15.9 ± 3.9 miles/week (mean ± SD); distance was increased without regard to speed. When running distance had increased by 30 miles/week (Δ30) to 46.2 ± 4.2 miles/week, resting heart rate decreased from 65.3 ± 14.0 to 58.4 ± 10.5 beats/min (P < .05), submaximal heart rate decreased from 170.0 ± 6.2 to 157.6 ± 11.1 beats/min (P < .05), treadmill duration increased from 10.8 ± 0.8 to 11.8 ± 1.0 min (P < .05), and lean body weight increased from 41.5 ± 1.3 to 42.5 ± 4.1 kg (P < .05). When running distance had increased by 50 miles/week (Δ50) to 62.0 ± 8.4 miles/week, resting heart rate decreased to 57.5 ± 12.4 beats/min (P < .05), submaximal heart rate decreased to 148.4 ± 11.7 beats/min (P < .02), treadmill duration time increased to 12.0 ± 1.1 min (P < .05), and lean body weight increased to 43.5 ± 1.4 kg (P < .001). Maximal oxygen uptake and maximal heart rate did not change. Serial M-mode echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular chamber size, wall thickness, and calculated left ventricular mass were not different than a reference group matched by age and sex and did not change at Δ30 or Δ50. Thus, moderate endurance running in women resulted in decreased resting and submaximal heart rate, increased treadmill endurance, and increased lean body weight. These changes indicative of a training effect occurred without primary alterations in cardiac dimensions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-212
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cardiac Rehabilitation
Volume3
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1983

Fingerprint

Body Composition
Heart Rate
Body Weight
Research Design
Age Groups
Oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effects of chronic, moderate endurance running on body composition and cardiac structure in women. / Marsh, R.; Lapan, D.; Goldman, Steven.

In: Journal of Cardiac Rehabilitation, Vol. 3, No. 3, 1983, p. 208-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{72e8bacfd9df428a9a9c8adb1a2470e1,
title = "Effects of chronic, moderate endurance running on body composition and cardiac structure in women",
abstract = "The effects of chronic endurance running on cardiac structure and function were studied in 12 young women. Initially subjects ran 15.9 ± 3.9 miles/week (mean ± SD); distance was increased without regard to speed. When running distance had increased by 30 miles/week (Δ30) to 46.2 ± 4.2 miles/week, resting heart rate decreased from 65.3 ± 14.0 to 58.4 ± 10.5 beats/min (P < .05), submaximal heart rate decreased from 170.0 ± 6.2 to 157.6 ± 11.1 beats/min (P < .05), treadmill duration increased from 10.8 ± 0.8 to 11.8 ± 1.0 min (P < .05), and lean body weight increased from 41.5 ± 1.3 to 42.5 ± 4.1 kg (P < .05). When running distance had increased by 50 miles/week (Δ50) to 62.0 ± 8.4 miles/week, resting heart rate decreased to 57.5 ± 12.4 beats/min (P < .05), submaximal heart rate decreased to 148.4 ± 11.7 beats/min (P < .02), treadmill duration time increased to 12.0 ± 1.1 min (P < .05), and lean body weight increased to 43.5 ± 1.4 kg (P < .001). Maximal oxygen uptake and maximal heart rate did not change. Serial M-mode echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular chamber size, wall thickness, and calculated left ventricular mass were not different than a reference group matched by age and sex and did not change at Δ30 or Δ50. Thus, moderate endurance running in women resulted in decreased resting and submaximal heart rate, increased treadmill endurance, and increased lean body weight. These changes indicative of a training effect occurred without primary alterations in cardiac dimensions.",
author = "R. Marsh and D. Lapan and Steven Goldman",
year = "1983",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "208--212",
journal = "Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention",
issn = "1932-7501",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of chronic, moderate endurance running on body composition and cardiac structure in women

AU - Marsh, R.

AU - Lapan, D.

AU - Goldman, Steven

PY - 1983

Y1 - 1983

N2 - The effects of chronic endurance running on cardiac structure and function were studied in 12 young women. Initially subjects ran 15.9 ± 3.9 miles/week (mean ± SD); distance was increased without regard to speed. When running distance had increased by 30 miles/week (Δ30) to 46.2 ± 4.2 miles/week, resting heart rate decreased from 65.3 ± 14.0 to 58.4 ± 10.5 beats/min (P < .05), submaximal heart rate decreased from 170.0 ± 6.2 to 157.6 ± 11.1 beats/min (P < .05), treadmill duration increased from 10.8 ± 0.8 to 11.8 ± 1.0 min (P < .05), and lean body weight increased from 41.5 ± 1.3 to 42.5 ± 4.1 kg (P < .05). When running distance had increased by 50 miles/week (Δ50) to 62.0 ± 8.4 miles/week, resting heart rate decreased to 57.5 ± 12.4 beats/min (P < .05), submaximal heart rate decreased to 148.4 ± 11.7 beats/min (P < .02), treadmill duration time increased to 12.0 ± 1.1 min (P < .05), and lean body weight increased to 43.5 ± 1.4 kg (P < .001). Maximal oxygen uptake and maximal heart rate did not change. Serial M-mode echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular chamber size, wall thickness, and calculated left ventricular mass were not different than a reference group matched by age and sex and did not change at Δ30 or Δ50. Thus, moderate endurance running in women resulted in decreased resting and submaximal heart rate, increased treadmill endurance, and increased lean body weight. These changes indicative of a training effect occurred without primary alterations in cardiac dimensions.

AB - The effects of chronic endurance running on cardiac structure and function were studied in 12 young women. Initially subjects ran 15.9 ± 3.9 miles/week (mean ± SD); distance was increased without regard to speed. When running distance had increased by 30 miles/week (Δ30) to 46.2 ± 4.2 miles/week, resting heart rate decreased from 65.3 ± 14.0 to 58.4 ± 10.5 beats/min (P < .05), submaximal heart rate decreased from 170.0 ± 6.2 to 157.6 ± 11.1 beats/min (P < .05), treadmill duration increased from 10.8 ± 0.8 to 11.8 ± 1.0 min (P < .05), and lean body weight increased from 41.5 ± 1.3 to 42.5 ± 4.1 kg (P < .05). When running distance had increased by 50 miles/week (Δ50) to 62.0 ± 8.4 miles/week, resting heart rate decreased to 57.5 ± 12.4 beats/min (P < .05), submaximal heart rate decreased to 148.4 ± 11.7 beats/min (P < .02), treadmill duration time increased to 12.0 ± 1.1 min (P < .05), and lean body weight increased to 43.5 ± 1.4 kg (P < .001). Maximal oxygen uptake and maximal heart rate did not change. Serial M-mode echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular chamber size, wall thickness, and calculated left ventricular mass were not different than a reference group matched by age and sex and did not change at Δ30 or Δ50. Thus, moderate endurance running in women resulted in decreased resting and submaximal heart rate, increased treadmill endurance, and increased lean body weight. These changes indicative of a training effect occurred without primary alterations in cardiac dimensions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020562737&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020562737&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 208

EP - 212

JO - Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention

JF - Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention

SN - 1932-7501

IS - 3

ER -