Effects of chronic, post-injury Cyclosporin A administration on motor and sensorimotor function following severe, experimental traumatic brain injury

Peter Riess, Florence M. Bareyre, Kathryn E. Saatman, Jessica A. Cheney, Jonathan Lifshitz, Ramesh Raghupathi, M. Sean Grady, Edmund Neugebauer, Tracy K. McIntosh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Cyclosporin A (CsA) is widely used in clinical situations to attenuate graft rejection following organ and central nervous system transplantation. Previous studies demonstrated that CsA administration is neuroprotective in models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, no studies, to date, have evaluated the influence of post-injury CsA administration on behavioral recovery after TBI. Methods: Rats (n = 33) were anesthetized and subjected to severe, lateral fluid percussion brain injury. Fifteen minutes thereafter, animals were randomized to receive the first of 28 daily injections of either CsA (10 mg/kg, ip) or saline. Sham-operated animals (n = 14) were anesthetized and surgically prepared without injury and treated daily either with CsA or saline. Motor and sensorimotor functions were assessed at one day before and two days after injury, and weekly thereafter up to 4 wks post-injury. Cognition was assessed at 1 and 4 wks post-injury using a Morris Water Maze test. Results: Injured animals showed significant impairments in motor, sensorimotor and cognitive function over the 4-week post-injury period. Injured animals treated with CsA showed a significant improvement in motor function assessed using a composite neuroscore (at day 28) and in sensorimotor function assessed using a sticky paper test (at days 2, 14, and 28) (p < 0.05, when compared to vehicle treated, injured animals). No beneficial effects on cognitive function were observed following CsA administration. Conclusion: These data suggest that daily post-injury treatment with CsA improves certain aspects of motor and sensorimotor function following experimental TBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalRestorative Neurology and Neuroscience
Volume18
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • CsA
  • Head injury
  • Immunosuppressant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology

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