Effects of compost on colonization of roots of plants grown in metalliferous mine tailings, as examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization

Sadie L. Iverson, Raina Margaret Maier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between compost amendment, plant biomass produced, and bacterial root colonization as measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization was examined following plant growth in mine tailings. Mine tailings can remain devoid of vegetation for decades after deposition due to a combination of factors that include heavy metal toxicity, low pH, poor substrate structure and water-holding capacity, and a severely impacted heterotrophic microbial community. Research has shown that plant establishment, a desired remedial objective to reduce eolian and water erosion of such tailings, is enhanced by organic matter amendment and is correlated with significant increases in rhizosphere populations of neutrophilic heterotrophic bacteria. Results show that for the acidic metalliferous tailings tested in this study, compost amendment was associated with significantly increased bacterial colonization of roots and increased production of plant biomass. In contrast, for a Vinton control soil, increased compost had no effect on root colonization and resulted only in increased plant biomass at high levels of compost amendment. These data suggest that the positive association between compost amendment and root colonization is important in the stressed mine tailings environment where root colonization may enhance both microbial and plant survival and growth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)842-847
Number of pages6
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

Fingerprint

Plant Roots
fluorescence in situ hybridization
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
tailings
compost
composts
root colonization
fluorescence
Soil
colonization
Biomass
biomass
bacterial colonization
water erosion
plant establishment
Rhizosphere
Water
water holding capacity
microbial communities
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Biotechnology
  • Ecology

Cite this

@article{d037b6cc758841c4977cc37420dde22e,
title = "Effects of compost on colonization of roots of plants grown in metalliferous mine tailings, as examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization",
abstract = "The relationship between compost amendment, plant biomass produced, and bacterial root colonization as measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization was examined following plant growth in mine tailings. Mine tailings can remain devoid of vegetation for decades after deposition due to a combination of factors that include heavy metal toxicity, low pH, poor substrate structure and water-holding capacity, and a severely impacted heterotrophic microbial community. Research has shown that plant establishment, a desired remedial objective to reduce eolian and water erosion of such tailings, is enhanced by organic matter amendment and is correlated with significant increases in rhizosphere populations of neutrophilic heterotrophic bacteria. Results show that for the acidic metalliferous tailings tested in this study, compost amendment was associated with significantly increased bacterial colonization of roots and increased production of plant biomass. In contrast, for a Vinton control soil, increased compost had no effect on root colonization and resulted only in increased plant biomass at high levels of compost amendment. These data suggest that the positive association between compost amendment and root colonization is important in the stressed mine tailings environment where root colonization may enhance both microbial and plant survival and growth.",
author = "Iverson, {Sadie L.} and Maier, {Raina Margaret}",
year = "2009",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1128/AEM.01434-08",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "75",
pages = "842--847",
journal = "Applied and Environmental Microbiology",
issn = "0099-2240",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of compost on colonization of roots of plants grown in metalliferous mine tailings, as examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization

AU - Iverson, Sadie L.

AU - Maier, Raina Margaret

PY - 2009/2

Y1 - 2009/2

N2 - The relationship between compost amendment, plant biomass produced, and bacterial root colonization as measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization was examined following plant growth in mine tailings. Mine tailings can remain devoid of vegetation for decades after deposition due to a combination of factors that include heavy metal toxicity, low pH, poor substrate structure and water-holding capacity, and a severely impacted heterotrophic microbial community. Research has shown that plant establishment, a desired remedial objective to reduce eolian and water erosion of such tailings, is enhanced by organic matter amendment and is correlated with significant increases in rhizosphere populations of neutrophilic heterotrophic bacteria. Results show that for the acidic metalliferous tailings tested in this study, compost amendment was associated with significantly increased bacterial colonization of roots and increased production of plant biomass. In contrast, for a Vinton control soil, increased compost had no effect on root colonization and resulted only in increased plant biomass at high levels of compost amendment. These data suggest that the positive association between compost amendment and root colonization is important in the stressed mine tailings environment where root colonization may enhance both microbial and plant survival and growth.

AB - The relationship between compost amendment, plant biomass produced, and bacterial root colonization as measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization was examined following plant growth in mine tailings. Mine tailings can remain devoid of vegetation for decades after deposition due to a combination of factors that include heavy metal toxicity, low pH, poor substrate structure and water-holding capacity, and a severely impacted heterotrophic microbial community. Research has shown that plant establishment, a desired remedial objective to reduce eolian and water erosion of such tailings, is enhanced by organic matter amendment and is correlated with significant increases in rhizosphere populations of neutrophilic heterotrophic bacteria. Results show that for the acidic metalliferous tailings tested in this study, compost amendment was associated with significantly increased bacterial colonization of roots and increased production of plant biomass. In contrast, for a Vinton control soil, increased compost had no effect on root colonization and resulted only in increased plant biomass at high levels of compost amendment. These data suggest that the positive association between compost amendment and root colonization is important in the stressed mine tailings environment where root colonization may enhance both microbial and plant survival and growth.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=59649091958&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=59649091958&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/AEM.01434-08

DO - 10.1128/AEM.01434-08

M3 - Article

VL - 75

SP - 842

EP - 847

JO - Applied and Environmental Microbiology

JF - Applied and Environmental Microbiology

SN - 0099-2240

IS - 3

ER -