Effects of low temperature storage on growth and transplant quality of non-grafted and grafted cantaloupe-type muskmelon seedlings

Ian Justus, Chieri Kubota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Grafting is a unique horticultural technology that allows the grower to select an alternate, compatible root system with natural disease resistance for their desired crop. Short-term storage of grafted seedlings under low temperature may extend the production window of grafted seedlings, reduce the labor input and increase production of grafted seedlings with a small propagation capacity. To evaluate the low temperature storage conditions, Cucumis melo 'Olympic Gold' seedlings were grafted onto Cucurbita maxima x Cucurbita moschata 'Tetsukabuto' rootstock and stored for a period of 2 or 4 weeks at 9, 12, or 15 °C under 12 μmol m-2 s-1 photosynthetic photon flux (PPF). The study demonstrated that grafted seedlings could be stored at 12 °C for 4 weeks without significant dry mass accumulation or effects on post-storage growth and development. Grafted seedlings stored at 15 °C for 4 weeks had a significant increase in dry mass and stem elongation; this was not observed for the non-grafted seedlings stored under the same conditions, suggesting that the rootstock enhanced the scion growth at lower temperatures than optimal for muskmelon. Storing muskmelon seedlings at 9 °C caused chilling damage but the damage was pronounced for non-grafted seedlings than grafted seedlings. 'Tetsukabuto' rootstock, an interspecific squash, presumably has a chilling tolerance and increased the storability of muskmelon seedlings. Further optimization is needed but there is potential for using this technique as a tool for mass production of grafted muskmelon seedlings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-54
Number of pages8
JournalScientia Horticulturae
Volume125
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 31 2010

Fingerprint

cantaloupes
muskmelons
storage temperature
seedlings
rootstocks
Cucurbita moschata
Cucurbita maxima
temperature
seedling production
squashes
Cucumis melo
scions
grafting (plants)
stem elongation
storage quality
storage conditions
cold tolerance
gold
disease resistance
root systems

Keywords

  • Controlled environment
  • Cucurbit
  • Grafted seedling production
  • Seedling storage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Horticulture

Cite this

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abstract = "Grafting is a unique horticultural technology that allows the grower to select an alternate, compatible root system with natural disease resistance for their desired crop. Short-term storage of grafted seedlings under low temperature may extend the production window of grafted seedlings, reduce the labor input and increase production of grafted seedlings with a small propagation capacity. To evaluate the low temperature storage conditions, Cucumis melo 'Olympic Gold' seedlings were grafted onto Cucurbita maxima x Cucurbita moschata 'Tetsukabuto' rootstock and stored for a period of 2 or 4 weeks at 9, 12, or 15 °C under 12 μmol m-2 s-1 photosynthetic photon flux (PPF). The study demonstrated that grafted seedlings could be stored at 12 °C for 4 weeks without significant dry mass accumulation or effects on post-storage growth and development. Grafted seedlings stored at 15 °C for 4 weeks had a significant increase in dry mass and stem elongation; this was not observed for the non-grafted seedlings stored under the same conditions, suggesting that the rootstock enhanced the scion growth at lower temperatures than optimal for muskmelon. Storing muskmelon seedlings at 9 °C caused chilling damage but the damage was pronounced for non-grafted seedlings than grafted seedlings. 'Tetsukabuto' rootstock, an interspecific squash, presumably has a chilling tolerance and increased the storability of muskmelon seedlings. Further optimization is needed but there is potential for using this technique as a tool for mass production of grafted muskmelon seedlings.",
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