Effects of propranolol on resting and postextrasystolic potentiated left ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease

Mark J. Friedman, Lawrence P. Temkin, Steven Goldman, Theron W. Ovitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of propranolol on global and segmental left ventricular function at rest and after postextrasystolic potentiation was studied in 12 patients with chest pain. Heart rate was controlled with atrial pacing, and left ventricular cineangiograms were performed before and after 0.15 mg/kg of propranolol. During each ventriculogram a premature ventricular stimulus was introduced by means of a programmed stimulator. Propranolol decreased global left ventricular ejection fraction from 64 ± 4.5 to 58 ± 4.6 (p < 0.03). Postextrasystolic potentiated global ejection fraction was not affected by propranolol (78 ± 3.5 vs 73.6 ± 3.4; p = NS). The area ejection fraction of the anteroapical region was decreased after propranolol (64 ± 4.8 vs 52 ± 6.5; p < 0.01); however, the postextrasystolic potentiated area ejection fraction was not affected by propranolol (78 ± 2.6 vs 71 ± 4.6; p = NS). Frame by frame analysis of the ventriculograms demonstrated that propranolol depressed global and segmental left ventricular function by affecting the second one-third ejection fraction without influencing the first or third one-third ejection fraction. Propranolol has a small depressant effect on global and segmental left ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease. Postextrasystolic potentiated global and segmental left ventricular function and early systolic ejection phase indices are not altered by propranolol and therefore may be useful in assessing left ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease who are taking propranolol.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-89
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume105
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1983

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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