Effects of sleep deprivation on cognition

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

442 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sleep deprivation is commonplace in modern society, but its far-reaching effects on cognitive performance are only beginning to be understood from a scientific perspective. While there is broad consensus that insufficient sleep leads to a general slowing of response speed and increased variability in performance, particularly for simple measures of alertness, attention and vigilance, there is much less agreement about the effects of sleep deprivation on many higher level cognitive capacities, including perception, memory and executive functions. Central to this debate has been the question of whether sleep deprivation affects nearly all cognitive capacities in a global manner through degraded alertness and attention, or whether sleep loss specifically impairs some aspects of cognition more than others. Neuroimaging evidence has implicated the prefrontal cortex as a brain region that may be particularly susceptible to the effects of sleep loss, but perplexingly, executive function tasks that putatively measure prefrontal functioning have yielded inconsistent findings within the context of sleep deprivation. Whereas many convergent and rule-based reasoning, decision making and planning tasks are relatively unaffected by sleep loss, more creative, divergent and innovative aspects of cognition do appear to be degraded by lack of sleep. Emerging evidence suggests that some aspects of higher level cognitive capacities remain degraded by sleep deprivation despite restoration of alertness and vigilance with stimulant countermeasures, suggesting that sleep loss may affect specific cognitive systems above and beyond the effects produced by global cognitive declines or impaired attentional processes. Finally, the role of emotion as a critical facet of cognition has received increasing attention in recent years and mounting evidence suggests that sleep deprivation may particularly affect cognitive systems that rely on emotional data. Thus, the extent to which sleep deprivation affects a particular cognitive process may depend on several factors, including the magnitude of global decline in general alertness and attention, the degree to which the specific cognitive function depends on emotion-processing networks, and the extent to which that cognitive process can draw upon associated cortical regions for compensatory support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Brain Research
PublisherElsevier B.V.
Pages105-129
Number of pages25
EditionC
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameProgress in Brain Research
NumberC
Volume185
ISSN (Print)0079-6123

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Cognition
  • Decision making
  • Emotion
  • Executive function
  • Perception
  • Sleep deprivation
  • Vigilance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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  • Cite this

    Killgore, W. D. S. (2010). Effects of sleep deprivation on cognition. In Progress in Brain Research (C ed., pp. 105-129). (Progress in Brain Research; Vol. 185, No. C). Elsevier B.V.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-53702-7.00007-5