Effects of thermal stress and level of feed intake on portal plasma flow and net fluxes of metabolites in lactating Holstein cows.

M. A. McGuire, D. K. Beede, M. A. DeLorenzo, C. J. Wilcox, G. B. Huntington, C. K. Reynolds, Robert J Collier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Six Holstein cows (averaging 475 kg body weight, 2.3 parities and 96 d in lactation) fitted with catheters in the hepatic portal vein, mesenteric vein and intercostalis posterior artery were exposed to treatments of thermal comfort environments with libitum or restricted (75% of ad libitum) DM intake and a thermal stress environment with ad libitum intake in two balanced 3 x 3 latin squares to evaluate effects of thermal stress on portal plasma flow and net fluxes of metabolites. Portal plasma flow was measured by administering a primed, continuous infusion of para-aminohippurate into a mesenteric vein and determining its concentration and dilution in portal vein plasma. Thermal stress treatment increased rectal temperatures and respiration rates. Dry matter intake decreased from thermal comfort ad libitum level (15.1 kg/d) to lower levels in thermal comfort restricted (11.5 kg/d) and thermal stress (11.1 kg/d) treatments. Portal plasma flow was related directly to level of DM intake, declining about 14% with thermal comfort restricted intake and thermal stress environment treatments compared with the thermal comfort restricted intake and thermal stress environment treatments compared with the thermal comfort ad libitum intake treatment. Net flux of alpha-amino N was reduced 20 and 35% by thermal comfort restricted intake and thermal stress treatments compared with the thermal comfort ad libitum intake treatment. Net fluxes of urea N, ammonia N and glucose were not affected by experimental treatments. A portion of the negative effects of thermal stress on milk production can be explained by decreased nutrient intake and decreased nutrient uptake by the portal-drained viscera of the cow.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1050-1060
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Animal Science
Volume67
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

thermal stress
Holstein
feed intake
Hot Temperature
metabolites
cows
heat
portal vein
Mesenteric Veins
animal organs
Portal Vein
respiratory rate
catheters
nutrient intake
nutrient uptake
arteries
dry matter intake
milk production
ammonia
lactation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

McGuire, M. A., Beede, D. K., DeLorenzo, M. A., Wilcox, C. J., Huntington, G. B., Reynolds, C. K., & Collier, R. J. (1989). Effects of thermal stress and level of feed intake on portal plasma flow and net fluxes of metabolites in lactating Holstein cows. Journal of Animal Science, 67(4), 1050-1060.

Effects of thermal stress and level of feed intake on portal plasma flow and net fluxes of metabolites in lactating Holstein cows. / McGuire, M. A.; Beede, D. K.; DeLorenzo, M. A.; Wilcox, C. J.; Huntington, G. B.; Reynolds, C. K.; Collier, Robert J.

In: Journal of Animal Science, Vol. 67, No. 4, 04.1989, p. 1050-1060.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McGuire, MA, Beede, DK, DeLorenzo, MA, Wilcox, CJ, Huntington, GB, Reynolds, CK & Collier, RJ 1989, 'Effects of thermal stress and level of feed intake on portal plasma flow and net fluxes of metabolites in lactating Holstein cows.', Journal of Animal Science, vol. 67, no. 4, pp. 1050-1060.
McGuire MA, Beede DK, DeLorenzo MA, Wilcox CJ, Huntington GB, Reynolds CK et al. Effects of thermal stress and level of feed intake on portal plasma flow and net fluxes of metabolites in lactating Holstein cows. Journal of Animal Science. 1989 Apr;67(4):1050-1060.
McGuire, M. A. ; Beede, D. K. ; DeLorenzo, M. A. ; Wilcox, C. J. ; Huntington, G. B. ; Reynolds, C. K. ; Collier, Robert J. / Effects of thermal stress and level of feed intake on portal plasma flow and net fluxes of metabolites in lactating Holstein cows. In: Journal of Animal Science. 1989 ; Vol. 67, No. 4. pp. 1050-1060.
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