Efficacy and Safety of Corneal Transplantation Using Corneas from Foreign Donors versus Domestic Donors: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Trial

Yingxin Chen, Congling Liao, Minghong Gao, Michael Wellington Belin, Mingwu Wang, Hai Yu, Jing Yu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose. To assess the efficacy and safety of corneal transplantation using corneas from foreign donors. Methods. One hundred and eight patients needing therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty were randomly divided into 2 groups (54 cases/group): foreign group using foreign donor corneas and domestic group using domestic donor corneas. Clinical outcome and incidence of postoperative complications were compared between groups. Results. No significant difference with respect to the therapeutic outcome and postoperative Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA) and neovascularization by final follow-up was observed between the two groups. The graft thickness in the foreign group was statistically higher than the domestic group at 1 month postoperatively, but not at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Corneal endothelial cell density in the domestic group was statistically higher than in the foreign group at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Corneal epithelial abnormalities in the foreign group were significantly higher than that in domestic group. The primary graft failure, incidence of graft survival, and postoperative complications such as immunologic rejection, graft infection, and secondary glaucoma were not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusions. Corneal transplantations using foreign donor corneas are as effective and safe as those using domestic donor corneas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number178289
JournalJournal of Ophthalmology
Volume2015
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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