Elderly hospitalized patients with diastolic heart failure: Lack of gender and ethnic differences in 18-month mortality rates

Said A. Ibrahim, Christopher J. Burant, Chian K Kwoh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Racial and gender differences in mortality rates have been reported for patients with systolic heart failure. Relatively little is known regarding diastolic heart failure prognosis. Methods. Our sample consisted of 1058 patients 65 years of age or older who were admitted to 30 hospitals in Northeastern Ohio with a principal diagnosis of heart failure and a left ventricular ejection fraction of ≥50% by echocardiogram. Results. Of the 1058 patients with diastolic heart failure (13% African American and 87% white), African Americans and whites were comparable with respect to history of angina, stroke, being on dialysis, and alcohol use; the proportion of male patients was also comparable. The African American to white adjusted odds ratio for 18-month mortality (all cause) was 1.03 (0.66-1.59). For men versus women (30% vs 70%), the above-mentioned comorbidities were comparable, except women were more likely to have a do not resuscitate status (16% vs 7.3%; p = .000) and to be older (79.5 ± 8 vs 77 ± 7; p = .000). Men were more likely to have a history of tobacco use (30% vs 14%; p = .000) and alcohol use (36% vs 15%; p = .000), and a higher serum creatinine level (1.7 ± 1.2 vs 1.4 ± 1.1: p = .001). The men to women adjusted odds ratio for 18-month mortality (all cause) was 1.06 (0.76-1.46). Conclusion. In this cohort of elderly patients admitted with diastolic heart failure, there were no ethnic or gender differences in 18-month mortality rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-59
Number of pages4
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume58
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Diastolic Heart Failure
Mortality
African Americans
Odds Ratio
Alcohols
Systolic Heart Failure
Tobacco Use
Stroke Volume
Comorbidity
Dialysis
Creatinine
Heart Failure
Stroke
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging

Cite this

@article{43263047174744dd9994066b8e82b399,
title = "Elderly hospitalized patients with diastolic heart failure: Lack of gender and ethnic differences in 18-month mortality rates",
abstract = "Background. Racial and gender differences in mortality rates have been reported for patients with systolic heart failure. Relatively little is known regarding diastolic heart failure prognosis. Methods. Our sample consisted of 1058 patients 65 years of age or older who were admitted to 30 hospitals in Northeastern Ohio with a principal diagnosis of heart failure and a left ventricular ejection fraction of ≥50{\%} by echocardiogram. Results. Of the 1058 patients with diastolic heart failure (13{\%} African American and 87{\%} white), African Americans and whites were comparable with respect to history of angina, stroke, being on dialysis, and alcohol use; the proportion of male patients was also comparable. The African American to white adjusted odds ratio for 18-month mortality (all cause) was 1.03 (0.66-1.59). For men versus women (30{\%} vs 70{\%}), the above-mentioned comorbidities were comparable, except women were more likely to have a do not resuscitate status (16{\%} vs 7.3{\%}; p = .000) and to be older (79.5 ± 8 vs 77 ± 7; p = .000). Men were more likely to have a history of tobacco use (30{\%} vs 14{\%}; p = .000) and alcohol use (36{\%} vs 15{\%}; p = .000), and a higher serum creatinine level (1.7 ± 1.2 vs 1.4 ± 1.1: p = .001). The men to women adjusted odds ratio for 18-month mortality (all cause) was 1.06 (0.76-1.46). Conclusion. In this cohort of elderly patients admitted with diastolic heart failure, there were no ethnic or gender differences in 18-month mortality rates.",
author = "Ibrahim, {Said A.} and Burant, {Christopher J.} and Kwoh, {Chian K}",
year = "2003",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "58",
pages = "56--59",
journal = "Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences",
issn = "1079-5006",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Elderly hospitalized patients with diastolic heart failure

T2 - Lack of gender and ethnic differences in 18-month mortality rates

AU - Ibrahim, Said A.

AU - Burant, Christopher J.

AU - Kwoh, Chian K

PY - 2003/1/1

Y1 - 2003/1/1

N2 - Background. Racial and gender differences in mortality rates have been reported for patients with systolic heart failure. Relatively little is known regarding diastolic heart failure prognosis. Methods. Our sample consisted of 1058 patients 65 years of age or older who were admitted to 30 hospitals in Northeastern Ohio with a principal diagnosis of heart failure and a left ventricular ejection fraction of ≥50% by echocardiogram. Results. Of the 1058 patients with diastolic heart failure (13% African American and 87% white), African Americans and whites were comparable with respect to history of angina, stroke, being on dialysis, and alcohol use; the proportion of male patients was also comparable. The African American to white adjusted odds ratio for 18-month mortality (all cause) was 1.03 (0.66-1.59). For men versus women (30% vs 70%), the above-mentioned comorbidities were comparable, except women were more likely to have a do not resuscitate status (16% vs 7.3%; p = .000) and to be older (79.5 ± 8 vs 77 ± 7; p = .000). Men were more likely to have a history of tobacco use (30% vs 14%; p = .000) and alcohol use (36% vs 15%; p = .000), and a higher serum creatinine level (1.7 ± 1.2 vs 1.4 ± 1.1: p = .001). The men to women adjusted odds ratio for 18-month mortality (all cause) was 1.06 (0.76-1.46). Conclusion. In this cohort of elderly patients admitted with diastolic heart failure, there were no ethnic or gender differences in 18-month mortality rates.

AB - Background. Racial and gender differences in mortality rates have been reported for patients with systolic heart failure. Relatively little is known regarding diastolic heart failure prognosis. Methods. Our sample consisted of 1058 patients 65 years of age or older who were admitted to 30 hospitals in Northeastern Ohio with a principal diagnosis of heart failure and a left ventricular ejection fraction of ≥50% by echocardiogram. Results. Of the 1058 patients with diastolic heart failure (13% African American and 87% white), African Americans and whites were comparable with respect to history of angina, stroke, being on dialysis, and alcohol use; the proportion of male patients was also comparable. The African American to white adjusted odds ratio for 18-month mortality (all cause) was 1.03 (0.66-1.59). For men versus women (30% vs 70%), the above-mentioned comorbidities were comparable, except women were more likely to have a do not resuscitate status (16% vs 7.3%; p = .000) and to be older (79.5 ± 8 vs 77 ± 7; p = .000). Men were more likely to have a history of tobacco use (30% vs 14%; p = .000) and alcohol use (36% vs 15%; p = .000), and a higher serum creatinine level (1.7 ± 1.2 vs 1.4 ± 1.1: p = .001). The men to women adjusted odds ratio for 18-month mortality (all cause) was 1.06 (0.76-1.46). Conclusion. In this cohort of elderly patients admitted with diastolic heart failure, there were no ethnic or gender differences in 18-month mortality rates.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037243204&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037243204&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12560412

AN - SCOPUS:0037243204

VL - 58

SP - 56

EP - 59

JO - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

JF - Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

SN - 1079-5006

IS - 1

ER -