Electrochemical investigation of the rate limiting mechanisms for trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride reduction at iron surfaces

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The rate limiting mechanisms for reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride (CT) and tetraethylene chloride (TCE) involve electron transfer were determined. The apparent Ea for CT reduction decreased with increasingly negative electrode potentials, suggesting that the rate of CT dechlorination is controlled by an electron transfer step. In contrast to CT, the Ea values for TCE exhibited a slight increase with decreasing E. Rates of CT reduction at iron surfaces were limited by the rate of electron transfer, while rates of TCE reduction were limited by chemical dependent factors. Reduction via an outer sphere mechanism might explain why halogenated alkanes undergo stepwise reductive dechlorination and produce chlorinated byproducts. In contrast, inner sphere reactions, which might involve chemisorption and thus produce longer interactions with the iron surface, might explain why the primary pathway for chlorinated alkene reduction produces few detectable chlorinated byproducts. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 222nd ACS National Meeting (Chicago, IL 8/26-30/2001).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationACS Division of Environmental Chemistry, Preprints
Pages739-744
Number of pages6
Volume41
Edition2
StatePublished - 2001
Event222nd ACS National Meeting - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Aug 26 2001Aug 30 2001

Other

Other222nd ACS National Meeting
CountryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period8/26/018/30/01

Fingerprint

Trichloroethylene
Carbon tetrachloride
Carbon Tetrachloride
Iron
Dechlorination
Chlorides
Byproducts
Electrons
Alkanes
Alkenes
Chemisorption
Interleukin-8
Paraffins
Olefins
Electrodes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Energy(all)

Cite this

Li, T., & Farrell, J. (2001). Electrochemical investigation of the rate limiting mechanisms for trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride reduction at iron surfaces. In ACS Division of Environmental Chemistry, Preprints (2 ed., Vol. 41, pp. 739-744)

Electrochemical investigation of the rate limiting mechanisms for trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride reduction at iron surfaces. / Li, Tie; Farrell, James.

ACS Division of Environmental Chemistry, Preprints. Vol. 41 2. ed. 2001. p. 739-744.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Li, T & Farrell, J 2001, Electrochemical investigation of the rate limiting mechanisms for trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride reduction at iron surfaces. in ACS Division of Environmental Chemistry, Preprints. 2 edn, vol. 41, pp. 739-744, 222nd ACS National Meeting, Chicago, IL, United States, 8/26/01.
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