Emotions, fiction, and cognitive architecture

Aaron Meskin, Jonathan M Weinberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent theorists suggest that our capacity to respond affectively to fictions depends on our ability to engage in simulation: either simulating a character in the fiction, or simulating someone reading or watching the fiction as though it were fact. We argue that such accounts are quite successful at accounting for many of the basic explananda of our affective engagements in fiction. Nonetheless, we argue further that simulationist accounts ultimately fail, for simulation involves an ineliminably egocentred element that is atypical of our experience of fiction. We then draw on recent work in philosophical psychology to articulate a more psychologically plausible account of our emotional engagement with fiction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-34
Number of pages17
JournalBritish Journal of Aesthetics
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cognitive Architecture
Emotion
Fiction
Simulation
Theorists
Explanandum
Philosophical Psychology
Affective

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy

Cite this

Emotions, fiction, and cognitive architecture. / Meskin, Aaron; Weinberg, Jonathan M.

In: British Journal of Aesthetics, Vol. 43, No. 1, 2003, p. 18-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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