Employee and employer support for workplace-based smoking cessation: Results from an international survey

Michael Halpern, Humphrey Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Workplace smoking cessation programs can increase smoking cessation rates, improve employee health, reduce exposure to second-hand smoke, and decrease costs. To assist with the development of such programs, we conducted a Global Workplace Smoking Survey to collect information on workplace attitudes towards smoking cessation programs. Methods: Data were collected from 1,403 employers (smoking and non-smoking) and 3,525 smoking employees participating in surveys in 14 countries in Asia, Europe, and South America in 2007. Results were weighted to ensure that they were representative of smokers and employers at companies with the specified number of employees. Results: More than two-thirds of employers (69%) but less than half of employees (48%) indicated that their company should help employees with smoking cessation. Approximately two-thirds of employees and 81% of employers overall felt that smoke-free policies encourage cessation, but fewer individuals from Europe (vs. from Asia or South America) agreed with this. In companies with a smoke-free policy, 76% of employees and 80% of employers felt that their policy had been somewhat, very, or extremely effective in motivating employees to quit or reduce smoking. Employers and employees differed substantially regarding appropriate methods for encouraging cessation, with more employees favouring financial incentives and more employers favouring education. Conclusions: Both employees and employers value smoke-free workplace programs and workplace cessation support activities, although many would like their companies to offer more support. These results will be useful for organizations exploring means of facilitating smoking cessation amongst employees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-382
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Occupational Health
Volume52
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Smoking Cessation
Workplace
Smoke-Free Policy
Smoking
South America
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Program Development
Occupational Health
Smoke
Motivation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Organizations
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Health policy
  • Occupational health services
  • Smoking cessation
  • Workplace

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Employee and employer support for workplace-based smoking cessation : Results from an international survey. / Halpern, Michael; Taylor, Humphrey.

In: Journal of Occupational Health, Vol. 52, No. 6, 11.2010, p. 375-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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