Empowered by Persuasive Deception: The Effects of Power and Deception on Dominance, Credibility, and Decision Making

Norah E. Dunbar, Matthew L. Jensen, Elena Bessarabova, Judee K Burgoon, Daniel Rex Bernard, Kylie J. Harrison, Katherine M. Kelley, Bradley J. Adame, Jacqueline M. Eckstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines how power differences and deception jointly influence interactional dominance, credibility, and the outcomes of decision-making. Two theories, interpersonal deception theory and dyadic power theory, were merged to produce hypotheses about the effects of power and deception. A 3 (power: unequal-high, unequal-low, equal) × 3 (deception: truth-truth, truthful with deceptive partner, deceptive with truthful partner) experiment (N = 120) was conducted in which participants were asked to make a series of mock hiring decisions. Actor-partner analyses revealed that participants in the deception condition reported a significant increase in perceptions of their own power whereas their truthful partners reported a significant decrease in perceptions of their own power. Further, interactional dominance fostered credibility and goal attainment (i.e., making the best hiring decision in the truthful condition and hiring a friend in the deceptive condition) for both truth-tellers and deceivers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)852-876
Number of pages25
JournalCommunication Research
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 8 2014

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credibility
Decision making
decision making
hiring
Experiments
goal attainment
Deception
Decision Making
Credibility
experiment
Interaction

Keywords

  • credibility
  • deception
  • dyadic power theory
  • interpersonal deception theory
  • persuasion
  • power

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Empowered by Persuasive Deception : The Effects of Power and Deception on Dominance, Credibility, and Decision Making. / Dunbar, Norah E.; Jensen, Matthew L.; Bessarabova, Elena; Burgoon, Judee K; Bernard, Daniel Rex; Harrison, Kylie J.; Kelley, Katherine M.; Adame, Bradley J.; Eckstein, Jacqueline M.

In: Communication Research, Vol. 41, No. 6, 08.08.2014, p. 852-876.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dunbar, NE, Jensen, ML, Bessarabova, E, Burgoon, JK, Bernard, DR, Harrison, KJ, Kelley, KM, Adame, BJ & Eckstein, JM 2014, 'Empowered by Persuasive Deception: The Effects of Power and Deception on Dominance, Credibility, and Decision Making', Communication Research, vol. 41, no. 6, pp. 852-876. https://doi.org/10.1177/0093650212447099
Dunbar, Norah E. ; Jensen, Matthew L. ; Bessarabova, Elena ; Burgoon, Judee K ; Bernard, Daniel Rex ; Harrison, Kylie J. ; Kelley, Katherine M. ; Adame, Bradley J. ; Eckstein, Jacqueline M. / Empowered by Persuasive Deception : The Effects of Power and Deception on Dominance, Credibility, and Decision Making. In: Communication Research. 2014 ; Vol. 41, No. 6. pp. 852-876.
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