End-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A prognostic indicator for survival

Arthur B Sanders, Karl B Kern, Charles W Otto, Melinda M. Milander, Gordon A. Ewy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

237 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effectiveness of ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation efforts is difficult to evaluate. Recent studies suggest that carbon dioxide excretion may be a useful noninvasive indicator of resuscitation from cardiac arrest. A prospective clinical study was done to determine whether end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation could be used as a prognostic indicator of resuscitation and survival. Thirty-five cardiac arrests in 34 patients were monitored with capnometry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation during a 1-year period. Nine patients who were successfully resuscitated had higher average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressures during cardiopulmonary resuscitation than 26 patients who could not be resuscitated (15±4 vs 7±5 mm Hg). The 3 patients who survived to leave the hospital had a higher average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure than the 32 nonsurvivors (17±6 vs 8±5 mm Hg). All 9 patients who were successfully resuscitated had an average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure of 10 mm Hg or greater. No patient with an average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure of less than 10 mm Hg was resuscitated. Data from this prospective clinical trial indicate that findings from end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are correlated with resuscitation from and survival of cardiac arrest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1347-1351
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume262
Issue number10
StatePublished - Sep 8 1989

Fingerprint

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Carbon Dioxide
Partial Pressure
Survival
Heart Arrest
Resuscitation
Clinical Trials
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

End-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation : A prognostic indicator for survival. / Sanders, Arthur B; Kern, Karl B; Otto, Charles W; Milander, Melinda M.; Ewy, Gordon A.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 262, No. 10, 08.09.1989, p. 1347-1351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f85fe94d39e142649de3d12ae263634d,
title = "End-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A prognostic indicator for survival",
abstract = "The effectiveness of ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation efforts is difficult to evaluate. Recent studies suggest that carbon dioxide excretion may be a useful noninvasive indicator of resuscitation from cardiac arrest. A prospective clinical study was done to determine whether end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation could be used as a prognostic indicator of resuscitation and survival. Thirty-five cardiac arrests in 34 patients were monitored with capnometry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation during a 1-year period. Nine patients who were successfully resuscitated had higher average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressures during cardiopulmonary resuscitation than 26 patients who could not be resuscitated (15±4 vs 7±5 mm Hg). The 3 patients who survived to leave the hospital had a higher average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure than the 32 nonsurvivors (17±6 vs 8±5 mm Hg). All 9 patients who were successfully resuscitated had an average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure of 10 mm Hg or greater. No patient with an average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure of less than 10 mm Hg was resuscitated. Data from this prospective clinical trial indicate that findings from end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are correlated with resuscitation from and survival of cardiac arrest.",
author = "Sanders, {Arthur B} and Kern, {Karl B} and Otto, {Charles W} and Milander, {Melinda M.} and Ewy, {Gordon A.}",
year = "1989",
month = "9",
day = "8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "262",
pages = "1347--1351",
journal = "JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association",
issn = "0002-9955",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - End-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

T2 - A prognostic indicator for survival

AU - Sanders, Arthur B

AU - Kern, Karl B

AU - Otto, Charles W

AU - Milander, Melinda M.

AU - Ewy, Gordon A.

PY - 1989/9/8

Y1 - 1989/9/8

N2 - The effectiveness of ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation efforts is difficult to evaluate. Recent studies suggest that carbon dioxide excretion may be a useful noninvasive indicator of resuscitation from cardiac arrest. A prospective clinical study was done to determine whether end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation could be used as a prognostic indicator of resuscitation and survival. Thirty-five cardiac arrests in 34 patients were monitored with capnometry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation during a 1-year period. Nine patients who were successfully resuscitated had higher average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressures during cardiopulmonary resuscitation than 26 patients who could not be resuscitated (15±4 vs 7±5 mm Hg). The 3 patients who survived to leave the hospital had a higher average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure than the 32 nonsurvivors (17±6 vs 8±5 mm Hg). All 9 patients who were successfully resuscitated had an average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure of 10 mm Hg or greater. No patient with an average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure of less than 10 mm Hg was resuscitated. Data from this prospective clinical trial indicate that findings from end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are correlated with resuscitation from and survival of cardiac arrest.

AB - The effectiveness of ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation efforts is difficult to evaluate. Recent studies suggest that carbon dioxide excretion may be a useful noninvasive indicator of resuscitation from cardiac arrest. A prospective clinical study was done to determine whether end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation could be used as a prognostic indicator of resuscitation and survival. Thirty-five cardiac arrests in 34 patients were monitored with capnometry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation during a 1-year period. Nine patients who were successfully resuscitated had higher average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressures during cardiopulmonary resuscitation than 26 patients who could not be resuscitated (15±4 vs 7±5 mm Hg). The 3 patients who survived to leave the hospital had a higher average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure than the 32 nonsurvivors (17±6 vs 8±5 mm Hg). All 9 patients who were successfully resuscitated had an average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure of 10 mm Hg or greater. No patient with an average end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure of less than 10 mm Hg was resuscitated. Data from this prospective clinical trial indicate that findings from end-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are correlated with resuscitation from and survival of cardiac arrest.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024425086&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024425086&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 2761035

AN - SCOPUS:0024425086

VL - 262

SP - 1347

EP - 1351

JO - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

JF - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

SN - 0002-9955

IS - 10

ER -