Enhanced hotoacoustic neuroimaging with gold nanorods and PEBBLEs

Russell S Witte, K. Kim, A. Ashish, W. Fan, R. Kopelman, N. Kotov, D. Kipke, M. O'Donnell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Photoacoustic (PA) imaging provides excellent optical contrast with decent penetration and high spatial resolution, making it attractive for a variety of neural applications. We evaluated optical contrast agents with high absorption in the near infrared (NIR) as potential enhancers for PA neuroimaging: optical dyes, gold nanorods (GNRs) and PEBBLEs loaded with indocyanine green. Two PA systems were developed to test these agents in excised neural tissue and in vivo mouse brain. Lobster nerves were stained with the agents for 30 minutes and placed in a hybrid nerve chamber capable of electrical stimulation and recording, optical spectroscopy and PA imaging. Contrast agents boosted the PA signal by at least 30 dB using NIR illumination from a tunable pulsed laser. Photobleaching may be a limiting factor for optical dyes-the PA signal decreased steadily with laser illumination. The second setup enabled in vivo transcranial imaging of the mouse brain. A custom clinical ultrasound scanner and a 10-MHz linear array provided near real-time images during and after an injection of 2 nM gold nanorods into the tail vein. The peak PA signal from the brain vasculature was enhanced by up to 2 dB at 710 nm. Temporal dynamics of the PA signal were also consistent with mixing of the GNRs in the blood. These studies provide a baseline for enhanced PA imaging in neural tissue. The smart contrast agents employed in this study can be further engineered for molecular targeting and controlled drug delivery with potential treatment for a myriad of neural disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume6856
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Event9th Conference on Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2008 - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 20 2008Jan 23 2008

Other

Other9th Conference on Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2008
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/20/081/23/08

Fingerprint

Neuroimaging
Photoacoustic effect
Nanorods
Gold
Imaging techniques
Brain
Dyes
Lighting
Tissue
Controlled drug delivery
Infrared radiation
Photobleaching
Pulsed lasers
Blood
Ultrasonics

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Invertebrate nerves
  • Molecular imaging
  • Mouse brain imaging
  • Neural engineering
  • Optical dyes
  • Optoacoustic
  • Ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Witte, R. S., Kim, K., Ashish, A., Fan, W., Kopelman, R., Kotov, N., ... O'Donnell, M. (2008). Enhanced hotoacoustic neuroimaging with gold nanorods and PEBBLEs. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 6856). [685614] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.764337

Enhanced hotoacoustic neuroimaging with gold nanorods and PEBBLEs. / Witte, Russell S; Kim, K.; Ashish, A.; Fan, W.; Kopelman, R.; Kotov, N.; Kipke, D.; O'Donnell, M.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6856 2008. 685614.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Witte, RS, Kim, K, Ashish, A, Fan, W, Kopelman, R, Kotov, N, Kipke, D & O'Donnell, M 2008, Enhanced hotoacoustic neuroimaging with gold nanorods and PEBBLEs. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 6856, 685614, 9th Conference on Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2008, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/20/08. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.764337
Witte RS, Kim K, Ashish A, Fan W, Kopelman R, Kotov N et al. Enhanced hotoacoustic neuroimaging with gold nanorods and PEBBLEs. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6856. 2008. 685614 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.764337
Witte, Russell S ; Kim, K. ; Ashish, A. ; Fan, W. ; Kopelman, R. ; Kotov, N. ; Kipke, D. ; O'Donnell, M. / Enhanced hotoacoustic neuroimaging with gold nanorods and PEBBLEs. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6856 2008.
@inproceedings{bb322c9f02704c7fa0b47322f41c8182,
title = "Enhanced hotoacoustic neuroimaging with gold nanorods and PEBBLEs",
abstract = "Photoacoustic (PA) imaging provides excellent optical contrast with decent penetration and high spatial resolution, making it attractive for a variety of neural applications. We evaluated optical contrast agents with high absorption in the near infrared (NIR) as potential enhancers for PA neuroimaging: optical dyes, gold nanorods (GNRs) and PEBBLEs loaded with indocyanine green. Two PA systems were developed to test these agents in excised neural tissue and in vivo mouse brain. Lobster nerves were stained with the agents for 30 minutes and placed in a hybrid nerve chamber capable of electrical stimulation and recording, optical spectroscopy and PA imaging. Contrast agents boosted the PA signal by at least 30 dB using NIR illumination from a tunable pulsed laser. Photobleaching may be a limiting factor for optical dyes-the PA signal decreased steadily with laser illumination. The second setup enabled in vivo transcranial imaging of the mouse brain. A custom clinical ultrasound scanner and a 10-MHz linear array provided near real-time images during and after an injection of 2 nM gold nanorods into the tail vein. The peak PA signal from the brain vasculature was enhanced by up to 2 dB at 710 nm. Temporal dynamics of the PA signal were also consistent with mixing of the GNRs in the blood. These studies provide a baseline for enhanced PA imaging in neural tissue. The smart contrast agents employed in this study can be further engineered for molecular targeting and controlled drug delivery with potential treatment for a myriad of neural disorders.",
keywords = "Cancer, Invertebrate nerves, Molecular imaging, Mouse brain imaging, Neural engineering, Optical dyes, Optoacoustic, Ultrasound",
author = "Witte, {Russell S} and K. Kim and A. Ashish and W. Fan and R. Kopelman and N. Kotov and D. Kipke and M. O'Donnell",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1117/12.764337",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780819470317",
volume = "6856",
booktitle = "Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Enhanced hotoacoustic neuroimaging with gold nanorods and PEBBLEs

AU - Witte, Russell S

AU - Kim, K.

AU - Ashish, A.

AU - Fan, W.

AU - Kopelman, R.

AU - Kotov, N.

AU - Kipke, D.

AU - O'Donnell, M.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Photoacoustic (PA) imaging provides excellent optical contrast with decent penetration and high spatial resolution, making it attractive for a variety of neural applications. We evaluated optical contrast agents with high absorption in the near infrared (NIR) as potential enhancers for PA neuroimaging: optical dyes, gold nanorods (GNRs) and PEBBLEs loaded with indocyanine green. Two PA systems were developed to test these agents in excised neural tissue and in vivo mouse brain. Lobster nerves were stained with the agents for 30 minutes and placed in a hybrid nerve chamber capable of electrical stimulation and recording, optical spectroscopy and PA imaging. Contrast agents boosted the PA signal by at least 30 dB using NIR illumination from a tunable pulsed laser. Photobleaching may be a limiting factor for optical dyes-the PA signal decreased steadily with laser illumination. The second setup enabled in vivo transcranial imaging of the mouse brain. A custom clinical ultrasound scanner and a 10-MHz linear array provided near real-time images during and after an injection of 2 nM gold nanorods into the tail vein. The peak PA signal from the brain vasculature was enhanced by up to 2 dB at 710 nm. Temporal dynamics of the PA signal were also consistent with mixing of the GNRs in the blood. These studies provide a baseline for enhanced PA imaging in neural tissue. The smart contrast agents employed in this study can be further engineered for molecular targeting and controlled drug delivery with potential treatment for a myriad of neural disorders.

AB - Photoacoustic (PA) imaging provides excellent optical contrast with decent penetration and high spatial resolution, making it attractive for a variety of neural applications. We evaluated optical contrast agents with high absorption in the near infrared (NIR) as potential enhancers for PA neuroimaging: optical dyes, gold nanorods (GNRs) and PEBBLEs loaded with indocyanine green. Two PA systems were developed to test these agents in excised neural tissue and in vivo mouse brain. Lobster nerves were stained with the agents for 30 minutes and placed in a hybrid nerve chamber capable of electrical stimulation and recording, optical spectroscopy and PA imaging. Contrast agents boosted the PA signal by at least 30 dB using NIR illumination from a tunable pulsed laser. Photobleaching may be a limiting factor for optical dyes-the PA signal decreased steadily with laser illumination. The second setup enabled in vivo transcranial imaging of the mouse brain. A custom clinical ultrasound scanner and a 10-MHz linear array provided near real-time images during and after an injection of 2 nM gold nanorods into the tail vein. The peak PA signal from the brain vasculature was enhanced by up to 2 dB at 710 nm. Temporal dynamics of the PA signal were also consistent with mixing of the GNRs in the blood. These studies provide a baseline for enhanced PA imaging in neural tissue. The smart contrast agents employed in this study can be further engineered for molecular targeting and controlled drug delivery with potential treatment for a myriad of neural disorders.

KW - Cancer

KW - Invertebrate nerves

KW - Molecular imaging

KW - Mouse brain imaging

KW - Neural engineering

KW - Optical dyes

KW - Optoacoustic

KW - Ultrasound

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=42149110298&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=42149110298&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1117/12.764337

DO - 10.1117/12.764337

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9780819470317

VL - 6856

BT - Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE

ER -