Environmental arsenic exposure, selenium and sputum alpha-1 antitrypsin

Jefferey L Burgess, Margaret Kurzius-Spencer, Gerald S. Poplin, Sally R. Littau, Michael J. Kopplin, Stefan Stürup, Scott A Boitano, Robert Clark Lantz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exposure to arsenic in drinking water is associated with increased respiratory disease. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) protects the lung against tissue destruction. The objective of this study was to determine whether arsenic exposure is associated with changes in airway AAT concentration and whether this relationship is modified by selenium. A total of 55 subjects were evaluated in Ajo and Tucson, Arizona. Tap water and first morning void urine were analyzed for arsenic species, induced sputum for AAT and toenails for selenium and arsenic. Household tap-water arsenic, toenail arsenic and urinary inorganic arsenic and metabolites were significantly higher in Ajo (20.6±3.5 μg/l, 0.54±0.77 μg/g and 27.7±21.2 μg/l, respectively) than in Tucson (3.9±2.5 μg/l, 0.16±0.20 μg/g and 13.0±13.8 μg/l, respectively). In multivariable models, urinary monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) was negatively, and toenail selenium positively associated with sputum AAT (P=0.004 and P=0.002, respectively). In analyses stratified by town, these relationships remained significant only in Ajo, with the higher arsenic exposure. Reduction in AAT may be a means by which arsenic induces respiratory disease, and selenium may protect against this adverse effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-155
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

alpha 1-Antitrypsin
Environmental Exposure
Selenium
Arsenic
Sputum
Nails
Pulmonary diseases
Water
Metabolites
Potable water
Drinking Water
Urine
Tissue
Lung
Acids

Keywords

  • alpha-1 antitrypsin
  • arsenic
  • MMA
  • selenium
  • sputum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Toxicology
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Environmental arsenic exposure, selenium and sputum alpha-1 antitrypsin. / Burgess, Jefferey L; Kurzius-Spencer, Margaret; Poplin, Gerald S.; Littau, Sally R.; Kopplin, Michael J.; Stürup, Stefan; Boitano, Scott A; Lantz, Robert Clark.

In: Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, Vol. 24, No. 2, 03.2014, p. 150-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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