Epictetus on Moral Perspectives

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Epictetus frequently tells us to remember our duties as son, brother, town councilor and the like, and thus to think of our duties in terms of a perspective embedded in our social lives. However, he also tells us to think in terms of the perspective of universal reason, from which the Stoic thinks of his duties as being owed to all rational humans. How are these two perspectives to be related in Epictetus' thought? This chapter argues that it is important that we think of the universal perspective as an ideal to which we aspire from within the social roles that form the structure of our actual lives, and defends this position against criticisms that it is too unambitious and quietistic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Philosophy of Epictetus
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Print)9780191716416, 9780199233076
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

Epictetus
Brothers
Stoics
Ideal
Social Life
Criticism
Thought

Keywords

  • Duties
  • Perspectives
  • Rational humans
  • Reason
  • Social lives
  • Universal reason

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Annas, J. E. (2008). Epictetus on Moral Perspectives. In The Philosophy of Epictetus Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199233076.003.0010

Epictetus on Moral Perspectives. / Annas, Julia E.

The Philosophy of Epictetus. Oxford University Press, 2008.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Annas, JE 2008, Epictetus on Moral Perspectives. in The Philosophy of Epictetus. Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199233076.003.0010
Annas JE. Epictetus on Moral Perspectives. In The Philosophy of Epictetus. Oxford University Press. 2008 https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199233076.003.0010
Annas, Julia E. / Epictetus on Moral Perspectives. The Philosophy of Epictetus. Oxford University Press, 2008.
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