Episodic memory: It's about time (and space)

Lynn Nadel, T Lee Ryan, K. Keil, K. Putnam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aggleton and Brown rightly point out the shortcomings of the medial temporal lobe hypothesis as an approach to anterograde amnesia. Their broader perspective is a necessary corrective, and one hopes it will be taken very seriously. Although they correctly note the dangers of conflating recognition and recall, they themselves make a similar mistake in discussing familiarity; we suggest an alternative approach. We also discuss implications of their view for an analysis of retrograde amnesia. The notion that there are two routes by which the hippocampus can reactivate neuronal ensembles in the neocortex could help us understand some currently puzzling facts about the dynamics of memory consolidation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-464
Number of pages2
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

Fingerprint

neocortex
Episodic Memory
hippocampus
space and time
Hope
Anterograde Amnesia
Retrograde Amnesia
familiarity
Neocortex
Temporal Lobe
consolidation
Hippocampus
Recognition (Psychology)
Memory Consolidation
analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Episodic memory : It's about time (and space). / Nadel, Lynn; Ryan, T Lee; Keil, K.; Putnam, K.

In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 22, No. 3, 1999, p. 463-464.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nadel, Lynn ; Ryan, T Lee ; Keil, K. ; Putnam, K. / Episodic memory : It's about time (and space). In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 1999 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 463-464.
@article{40f0c9609d85448ab18605c4dcde03d5,
title = "Episodic memory: It's about time (and space)",
abstract = "Aggleton and Brown rightly point out the shortcomings of the medial temporal lobe hypothesis as an approach to anterograde amnesia. Their broader perspective is a necessary corrective, and one hopes it will be taken very seriously. Although they correctly note the dangers of conflating recognition and recall, they themselves make a similar mistake in discussing familiarity; we suggest an alternative approach. We also discuss implications of their view for an analysis of retrograde amnesia. The notion that there are two routes by which the hippocampus can reactivate neuronal ensembles in the neocortex could help us understand some currently puzzling facts about the dynamics of memory consolidation.",
author = "Lynn Nadel and Ryan, {T Lee} and K. Keil and K. Putnam",
year = "1999",
doi = "10.1017/S0140525X99402031",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "463--464",
journal = "Behavioral and Brain Sciences",
issn = "0140-525X",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Episodic memory

T2 - It's about time (and space)

AU - Nadel, Lynn

AU - Ryan, T Lee

AU - Keil, K.

AU - Putnam, K.

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - Aggleton and Brown rightly point out the shortcomings of the medial temporal lobe hypothesis as an approach to anterograde amnesia. Their broader perspective is a necessary corrective, and one hopes it will be taken very seriously. Although they correctly note the dangers of conflating recognition and recall, they themselves make a similar mistake in discussing familiarity; we suggest an alternative approach. We also discuss implications of their view for an analysis of retrograde amnesia. The notion that there are two routes by which the hippocampus can reactivate neuronal ensembles in the neocortex could help us understand some currently puzzling facts about the dynamics of memory consolidation.

AB - Aggleton and Brown rightly point out the shortcomings of the medial temporal lobe hypothesis as an approach to anterograde amnesia. Their broader perspective is a necessary corrective, and one hopes it will be taken very seriously. Although they correctly note the dangers of conflating recognition and recall, they themselves make a similar mistake in discussing familiarity; we suggest an alternative approach. We also discuss implications of their view for an analysis of retrograde amnesia. The notion that there are two routes by which the hippocampus can reactivate neuronal ensembles in the neocortex could help us understand some currently puzzling facts about the dynamics of memory consolidation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032790635&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032790635&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0140525X99402031

DO - 10.1017/S0140525X99402031

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0032790635

VL - 22

SP - 463

EP - 464

JO - Behavioral and Brain Sciences

JF - Behavioral and Brain Sciences

SN - 0140-525X

IS - 3

ER -