Ergonomic decision-making: A conceptual framework for experienced practitioners from backgrounds in industrial engineering and physical therapy

Karen M. Piegorsch, Ken W. Watkins, Walter W. Piegorsch, Belinda Reininger, Sara J. Corwin, Robert F. Valois

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ergonomists play an important role in preventing and controlling work-related injuries and illnesses, yet little is known about the decision-making processes that lead to their recommendations. This study (1) generated a data-grounded conceptual framework, based on schema theory, for ergonomic decision-making by experienced practitioners in the USA and (2) assessed the adequacy of that framework for describing the decision-making of ergonomics practitioners from backgrounds in industrial engineering (IE) and physical therapy (PT). A combination of qualitative and quantitative analyses, within and across 54 decision-making situations derived from in-depth interviews with 21 practitioners, indicated that a single framework adequately describes the decision-making of experienced practitioners from these backgrounds. Results indicate that demands of the practitioner environment and practitioner factors such as personality more strongly influence the decision-making of experienced ergonomics practitioners than does practitioner background in IE or PT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)587-598
Number of pages12
JournalApplied Ergonomics
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Decision-making
  • Ergonomics practice
  • Industrial engineering
  • Physical therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ergonomic decision-making: A conceptual framework for experienced practitioners from backgrounds in industrial engineering and physical therapy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this