Estimating functional population for facility planning

Arthur Christian Nelson, James C. Nicholas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In estimating the current and future demand for facilities, engineers and planners need to rationalize differences in facility demand by land-use category. Using unweighted population and employment data to estimate facility needs may result in substantial error. The solution is to properly weight population and employment figures to create a common unit of measure, the functional population, defined as the number of people occupying space in the community on a 24 hr per day, seven-day-per-week basis. By estimating the functional population of a community, estimations of current and future demand for certain facilities can be improved. This paper offers a reasonably convenient method for estimating the functional population for a current and future year. It applies the functional population concept to estimating the current and future demand for fire protection, police, emergency medical, jail and detention, courts, and government administration facilities for a hypothetical community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-58
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Urban Planning and Development
Volume118
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Planning
planning
demand
employment figure
Prisons
Fire protection
community
Law enforcement
Land use
land use
engineer
police
Engineers
need
fire protection
method
court

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Development
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Estimating functional population for facility planning. / Nelson, Arthur Christian; Nicholas, James C.

In: Journal of Urban Planning and Development, Vol. 118, No. 2, 1992, p. 45-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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