Etomidate for procedural sedation in the emergency department

Samuel M Keim, Brian L Erstad, John C. Sakles, Virgil Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objective. To review our experience with etomidate in nonintubated patients in the emergency department. Design. A 2-year retrospective chart review of consecutive patients receiving etomidate for sedation. Setting. Emergency department of a university-based teaching hospital. Patients. Forty-eight patients who underwent painful procedures in the emergency department. Measurements and Main Results. Demographics, dosing information, recovery times, and adverse events were abstracted using a standardized data collection form. Forty-eight nonintubated patients were sedated with etomidate. Mean age was 34 years (range 6-80 yrs); 38 were men and 10 women; two were children. The mean initial dose of etomidate was 13 mg. Adverse events occurred in 11 (21%) patients. None sustained any substantial morbidity as indicated by need for intubation, prolonged emergency department stay, or hospital admission. Conclusion. Although controversial, etomidate holds promise as a potent sedative agent for patients undergoing painful procedures in the emergency department. A large prospective evaluation is needed to document the performance and complications of this agent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)586-592
Number of pages7
JournalPharmacotherapy
Volume22
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Etomidate
Hospital Emergency Service
Proxy
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Intubation
Teaching Hospitals
Length of Stay
Demography
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Etomidate for procedural sedation in the emergency department. / Keim, Samuel M; Erstad, Brian L; Sakles, John C.; Davis, Virgil.

In: Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 22, No. 5, 2002, p. 586-592.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Keim, SM, Erstad, BL, Sakles, JC & Davis, V 2002, 'Etomidate for procedural sedation in the emergency department', Pharmacotherapy, vol. 22, no. 5, pp. 586-592.
Keim, Samuel M ; Erstad, Brian L ; Sakles, John C. ; Davis, Virgil. / Etomidate for procedural sedation in the emergency department. In: Pharmacotherapy. 2002 ; Vol. 22, No. 5. pp. 586-592.
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