Evaluating participation in small groups: Stimulated recall, self-ratings, and their effects on task-relevant judgments

Joseph A Bonito, Erin K. Ruppel, Mary H. Decamp, Isabel Garreaud de Mainvilliers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines if different conditions of stimulated recall influence perceptions of task-related competence in small discussion groups. Although the validity of simulated recall has been assessed in educational and interpersonal contexts, it is not clear how features of the method influence the measurement of perceptions at different levels of analysis. Participants worked on a task in groups and then viewed a videotape of the interaction. The video was paused for participants to rate each other on several influence measures. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four viewing conditions based on whether participants could see themselves in the video and whether they made self-ratings regarding their participation. Findings revealed that self's visual presence in the video and providing self-ratings had only a minor impact on the distribution of influence ratings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-47
Number of pages20
JournalCommunication Methods and Measures
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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Evaluating participation in small groups : Stimulated recall, self-ratings, and their effects on task-relevant judgments. / Bonito, Joseph A; Ruppel, Erin K.; Decamp, Mary H.; de Mainvilliers, Isabel Garreaud.

In: Communication Methods and Measures, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 28-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bonito, Joseph A ; Ruppel, Erin K. ; Decamp, Mary H. ; de Mainvilliers, Isabel Garreaud. / Evaluating participation in small groups : Stimulated recall, self-ratings, and their effects on task-relevant judgments. In: Communication Methods and Measures. 2011 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 28-47.
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