Evaluating provider acceptance of pharmacist interventions in the Discharge Companion Program and its association with readmission reduction

Omar Jamjoom, Srujitha Marupuru, Ann M. Taylor, Terri Warholak, Nicole Scovis, Jennifer M. Bingham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate provider acceptance of pharmacist interventions within the Discharge Companion Program (DCP) and its association with hospital readmissions. Methods: This retrospective record review included patients referred to the DCP between January and October 2018. DCP pharmacists’ interventions were assessed for provider acceptance on follow-up consultation or readmission. A chi-square test assessed the association between provider acceptance, communication modality, and technology used. A logistic regression model assessed the association between readmission risk and variables of interest. An a priori alpha level of 0.05 was used. Results: Of the 197 patients referred to the DCP, 102 met inclusion criteria. DCP pharmacists made a total of 271 interventions; 185 (68.7%) required provider action. The most common intervention type was medication addition or discontinuation (n = 74, 40%); the communication mode was between DCP nurses and primary care provider offices or skilled nursing facilities (n = 56, 54.9%); and the preferred technology was the telephone (n = 58, 56.9%). Provider acceptance rate was 30.8% (n = 57) of actionable interventions, although it was not significantly associated with 30-day readmission reductions (P = 0.833) and did not differ significantly when interventions were communicated to other health care professionals (P = 0.53). The specific intervention communication mode (i.e., telephone, facsimile, or both) of pharmacist interventions did not significantly affect provider acceptance (P = 0.133). The overall readmission rate was 22.5% (n = 23), and the only significant predictor of 30-day readmission was the number of comorbidities (odds ratio 1.28 [95% CI 1.03–1.58], P = 0.024). Conclusion: Provider acceptance of pharmacists’ interventions did not significantly affect 30-day readmission rates, regardless of communication mode (telephone or facsimile) or technology used. However, the DCP successfully identified numerous medication-related problems. Further study is warranted regarding provider acceptance of pharmacist recommendations on 30-day readmission reduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Pharmacists Association
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (nursing)
  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology

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