Evaluating self and others in electronic and face-to-face groups

Suzanne Weisband, Leanne Atwater

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

105 Scopus citations

Abstract

After completing a decision task electronically or face to face, 105 students rated their own and other group members' contribution to the task completion and their degree of liking for group members. Actual contributions were the number of task relevant remarks each person contributed. Results indicated that self-ratings of contribution were more inflated and less accurate in electronic communication than in face-to-face communication. Liking accounted for significant variance in ratings of others' contributions in face-to-face groups, whereas actual contribution accounted for significant variance in ratings of others in electronic groups. Results suggest that rating biases stemming from liking are evident in ratings of others in face-to-face groups but not in electronic. Implications for online performance evaluations are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)632-639
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume84
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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