Evaluation of difloxacin for shrimp aquaculture: In vitro minimum inhibitory concentrations, medicated feed palatability, and toxicity to the shrimp penaeus vannamei

Eric D. Park, Donald V Lightner, Rodney R. Williams, Leone L. Mohney, John M. Stamm

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Abstract

Standard in vitro minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for difloxacin and compared with the MICs of several other antimicrobials against a standardized battery of 13 gram-negative bacterial isolates associated with shrimp disease. The palatability and safety (toxicity) of difloxacin to the shrimp Penaeus vannamei were also evaluated during 15 d of medicated feeding at 1 × (100 mg/kg of feed), 2×, and 4× treatment levels to give doses of approximately5, 10, and20 mg difloxacin/kg body weight. A significant reduction (P <0.05) in difloxacin-medicated feed palatability was noted in the 2× and 4× trials. However, differences were still acceptable, because more than 80% of the feeds were consumed in both treatments relative to the control diet. Shrimp mortality rates increased with difloxacin level from 7% for the control treatment to 20% for the 4× treatment. Differences in percent survival were not significant (P> 0.05)by the Williams test however, analysis of mean survival time indicated that difloxacin significantly (P ≤ 0.05) reduced survival time at the highest dose. Signs of animal stress, characterized by extreme lethargy, were noted in the 4× treatment. An actual therapeutic dose for difloxacin in penaeid shrimp is unknown; however, the 1× treatment (100-mg/kg) was acceptable with respect to both palatability and toxicity, where as 400 mg/kg of feed or more may be unpalatable and toxic to shrimp.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-167
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Aquatic Animal Health
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

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difloxacin
medicated feeds
shrimp culture
palatability
Litopenaeus vannamei
minimum inhibitory concentration
aquaculture
shrimp
toxicity
dosage
animal stress
Penaeidae
safety
animal
anti-infective agents
dose
evaluation
therapeutics
body weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Evaluation of difloxacin for shrimp aquaculture : In vitro minimum inhibitory concentrations, medicated feed palatability, and toxicity to the shrimp penaeus vannamei. / Park, Eric D.; Lightner, Donald V; Williams, Rodney R.; Mohney, Leone L.; Stamm, John M.

In: Journal of Aquatic Animal Health, Vol. 7, No. 2, 1995, p. 161-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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