Evaluation of funnel traps for characterizing the bark beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) communities in Ponderosa pine forests of North-Central Arizona

Christopher J. Hayes, Tom E. DeGomez, Karen M. Clancy, Kelly K. Williams, Joel D. McMillin, John A. Anhold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lindgren funnel traps baited with aggregation pheromones are widely used to monitor and manage populations of economically important bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). This study was designed to advance our understanding of how funnel trap catches assess bark beetle communities and relative abundance of individual species. In the second year (2005) of a 3-yr study of the bark beetle community structure in north-central Arizona pine (Pinus spp.) forests, we collected data on stand structure, site conditions, and local bark beetle-induced tree mortality at each trap site. We also collected samples of bark from infested (brood) trees near trap sites to identify and determine the population density of bark beetles that were attacking ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson, in the area surrounding the traps. Multiple regression models indicated that the number of Dendroctonus and Ips beetles captured in 2005 was inversely related to elevation of the trap site, and positively associated with the amount of ponderosa pine in the stand surrounding the site. Traps located closer to brood trees also captured more beetles. The relationship between trap catches and host tree mortality was weak and inconsistent in forest stands surrounding the funnel traps, suggesting that trap catches do not provide a good estimate of local beetle-induced tree mortality. However, pheromone-baited funnel trap data and data from gallery identification in bark samples produced statistically similar relative abundance profiles for the five species of bark beetles that we examined, indicating that funnel trap data provided a good assessment of species presence and relative abundance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1253-1265
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of economic entomology
Volume101
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2008

Keywords

  • Dendroctonus
  • Ips
  • Multiple regression models
  • Pinus ponderosa
  • Stand characteristics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Insect Science

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