Event-method directed forgetting: Forgetting a video segment is more effortful than remembering it

Jonathan M. Fawcett, Tracy L. Taylor, Lynn Nadel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Videos were presented depicting events such as baking cookies or cleaning a fish tank. Periodically, the video paused and an instruction to Remember (R) or Forget (F) the preceding video segment was presented; the video then resumed. Participants later responded more accurately to cued-recall questions (E1) and to true/false statements (E2-5) regarding R segments than F segments. This difference was larger for specific information (the woman added 3 cups of flour) than for general information (the woman added flour). Participants were also slower to detect visual probes presented following F instructions compared to those presented following R instructions. These findings suggest that intentional forgetting is an effortful process that can be performed even on segments of otherwise continuous events and that the result is a relatively impoverished representation of the unwanted information in memory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)332-343
Number of pages12
JournalActa Psychologica
Volume144
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Events
  • Intentional forgetting
  • Memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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