Evidence of nonconscious stereotyping of hispanic patients by nursing and medical students

Meghan G. Bean, Jeffrey A Stone, Gordon B. Moskowitz, Terry A Badger, Elizabeth S. Focella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Current research on nonconscious stereotyping in healthcare is limited by an emphasis on practicing physicians' beliefs about African American patients and by heavy reliance on a measure of nonconscious processes that allows participants to exert control over their behaviors if they are motivated to appear nonbiased. OBJECTIVES: The present research examined whether nursing and medical students exhibit nonconscious activation of stereotypes about Hispanic patients using a task that subliminally primes patient ethnicity. It was hypothesized that participants would exhibit greater activation of noncompliance and health risk stereotypes after subliminal exposure to Hispanic faces compared with non-Hispanic White faces and, because ethnicity was primed outside of conscious awareness, that explicit motivations to control prejudice would not moderate stereotype activation. METHODS: Nursing and medical students completed a sequential priming task that measured the speed with which they recognized words related to noncompliance and health risk after subliminal exposure to Hispanic and non-Hispanic White faces. They then completed explicit measures of their motivation to control prejudice against Hispanics. RESULTS: Both nursing and medical students exhibited greater activation of noncompliance and health risk words after subliminal exposure to Hispanic faces, compared with non-Hispanic White faces. Explicit motivations to control prejudice did not moderate stereotype activation. DISCUSSION: These findings show that, regardless of their motivation to treat Hispanics fairly, nursing and medical students exhibit nonconscious activation of negative stereotypes when they encounter Hispanics. Implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)362-367
Number of pages6
JournalNursing Research
Volume62
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

Stereotyping
Nursing Students
Medical Students
Hispanic Americans
Motivation
Health
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Research
African Americans
Delivery of Health Care
Physicians

Keywords

  • healthcare disparities
  • Hispanic Americans
  • minority health
  • nonconscious processes
  • prejudice
  • stereotyping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Evidence of nonconscious stereotyping of hispanic patients by nursing and medical students. / Bean, Meghan G.; Stone, Jeffrey A; Moskowitz, Gordon B.; Badger, Terry A; Focella, Elizabeth S.

In: Nursing Research, Vol. 62, No. 5, 09.2013, p. 362-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bean, Meghan G. ; Stone, Jeffrey A ; Moskowitz, Gordon B. ; Badger, Terry A ; Focella, Elizabeth S. / Evidence of nonconscious stereotyping of hispanic patients by nursing and medical students. In: Nursing Research. 2013 ; Vol. 62, No. 5. pp. 362-367.
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