Evolution of climatic niche specialization: a phylogenetic analysis in amphibians

Maria Fernanda Bonetti, John J Wiens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The evolution of climatic niche specialization has important implications for many topics in ecology, evolution and conservation. The climatic niche reflects the set of temperature and precipitation conditions where a species can occur. Thus, specialization to a limited set of climatic conditions can be important for understanding patterns of biogeography, species richness, community structure, allopatric speciation, spread of invasive species and responses to climate change. Nevertheless, the factors that determine climatic niche width (level of specialization) remain poorly explored. Here, we test whether species that occur in more extreme climates are more highly specialized for those conditions, and whether there are trade-offs between niche widths on different climatic niche axes (e.g. do species that tolerate a broad range of temperatures tolerate only a limited range of precipitation regimes?). We test these hypotheses in amphibians, using phylogenetic comparative methods and global-scale datasets, including 2712 species with both climatic and phylogenetic data. Our results do not support either hypothesis. Rather than finding narrower niches in more extreme environments, niches tend to be narrower on one end of a climatic gradient but wider on the other. We also find that temperature and precipitation niche breadths are positively related, rather than showing trade-offs. Finally, our results suggest that most amphibian species occur in relatively warm and dry environments and have relatively narrow climatic niche widths on both of these axes. Thus, they may be especially imperilled by anthropogenic climate change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPhilosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological sciences
Volume281
Issue number1795
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 22 2014

Fingerprint

Amphibians
amphibian
amphibians
niche
niches
Climate Change
phylogenetics
Climate change
Temperature
phylogeny
Introduced Species
Ecology
Climate
Conservation
climate change
niche breadth
allopatric speciation
analysis
temperature
dry environmental conditions

Keywords

  • amphibians
  • climate
  • evolution
  • niche
  • phylogeny
  • specialization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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