Evolution of rapid development in spadefoot toads is unrelated to arid environments

Cen Zeng, Ivan Gomez-Mestre, John J Wiens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The extent to which species' life histories evolve to match climatic conditions is a critical question in evolutionary biology and ecology and as human activities rapidly modify global climate. GIS-based climatic data offer new opportunities to rigorously test this question. Superficially, the spadefoot toads of North America (Scaphiopodidae) seem to offer a classic example of adaptive life-history evolution: some species occur in extremely dry deserts and have evolved the shortest aquatic larval periods known among anurans. However, the relationships between the climatic conditions where spadefoots occur and the relevant life-history traits have not been explicitly tested. Here, we analyzed these relationships using GIS-based climatic data, published life-history data, and a time-calibrated phylogeny for pelobatoid frogs. Surprisingly, we find no significant relationships between life-history variables and precipitation or aridity levels where these species occur. Instead, rapid development in pelobatoids is strongly related to their small genome sizes and to phylogeny.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere96637
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 6 2014

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dry environmental conditions
toads
Anura
Geographic information systems
life history
Ecology
Phylogeny
Genes
Genome Size
North America
Climate
Human Activities
phylogeny
frogs
deserts
climate
ecology
Biological Sciences
genome
testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Evolution of rapid development in spadefoot toads is unrelated to arid environments. / Zeng, Cen; Gomez-Mestre, Ivan; Wiens, John J.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 5, e96637, 06.05.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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