Evolutionary ecology of insect adaptation to Bt crops

Yves Carriere, David W. Crowder, Bruce E Tabashnik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

159 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins are used worldwide to control major pests of corn and cotton. Development of strategies to delay the evolution of pest resistance to Bt crops requires an understanding of factors affecting responses to natural selection, which include variation in survival on Bt crops, heritability of resistance, and fitness advantages associated with resistance mutations. The two main strategies adopted for delaying resistance are the refuge and pyramid strategies. Both can reduce heritability of resistance, but pyramids can also delay resistance by reducing genetic variation for resistance. Seasonal declines in the concentration of Bt toxins in transgenic cultivars, however, can increase the heritability of resistance. The fitness advantages associated with resistance mutations can be reduced by agronomic practices, including increasing refuge size, manipulating refuges to increase fitness costs, and manipulating Bt cultivars to reduce fitness of resistant individuals. Manipulating costs and fitness of resistant individuals on transgenic insecticidal crops may be especially important for thwarting evolution of resistance in haplodiploid and parthenogenetic pests. Field-evolved resistance to Bt crops in only five pests during the last 14years suggests that the refuge strategy has successfully delayed resistance, but the accumulation of resistant pests could accelerate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)561-573
Number of pages13
JournalEvolutionary Applications
Volume3
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Fingerprint

insect ecology
Bacillus thuringiensis
Ecology
Insects
fitness
refuge
insect
ecology
heritability
crop
crops
pests
toxin
genetically modified organisms
cultivar
mutation
pest resistance
toxins
Costs and Cost Analysis
Pest Control

Keywords

  • Bacillus thuringiensis
  • Fitness cost
  • Host-plant resistance
  • Incomplete resistance
  • Population dynamics
  • Resistance management
  • Transgenic crops

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics

Cite this

Evolutionary ecology of insect adaptation to Bt crops. / Carriere, Yves; Crowder, David W.; Tabashnik, Bruce E.

In: Evolutionary Applications, Vol. 3, No. 5-6, 09.2010, p. 561-573.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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