Examining clinical trial results with single-subject analysis: An example involving behavioral and nutrition treatment for young children with cystic fibrosis

Scott W. Powers, Carrie Piazza-Waggoner, Julie S. Jones, Kathleen S. Ferguson, Cori L Daines, James D. Acton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the process of change in a clinical trial of behavioral and nutrition treatment for children age 18-48 months with cystic fibrosis (CF) using single-subject analysis. Methods: The 5-week treatment included nutrition counseling and child behavioral management training for parents and was designed to increase energy intake measured by diet diaries 600-800 calories per day. Results: Energy intake changed at each meal, only when treatment was introduced (week 1: snacks, 420 to 691; week 2: breakfast, 325 to 443; week 4: lunch, 350 to 443; and week 5: dinner, 373 to 460 calories per day). Total daily intake increased in a systematic fashion that exceeded the criterion set each week during treatment. Conclusions: Toddlers and preschoolers with CF meet energy intake recommendations as a result of behavioral intervention. Single-subject research designs are important methodologies for advancing clinical investigation in pediatric psychology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)574-581
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cystic Fibrosis
Energy Intake
Clinical Trials
Meals
Child Psychology
Lunch
Snacks
Breakfast
Therapeutics
Counseling
Research Design
Parents
Diet

Keywords

  • Changing criterion design
  • Multiple baseline design
  • Parenting
  • Pediatrics
  • Single case experimental designs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Examining clinical trial results with single-subject analysis : An example involving behavioral and nutrition treatment for young children with cystic fibrosis. / Powers, Scott W.; Piazza-Waggoner, Carrie; Jones, Julie S.; Ferguson, Kathleen S.; Daines, Cori L; Acton, James D.

In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Vol. 31, No. 6, 07.2006, p. 574-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Powers, Scott W. ; Piazza-Waggoner, Carrie ; Jones, Julie S. ; Ferguson, Kathleen S. ; Daines, Cori L ; Acton, James D. / Examining clinical trial results with single-subject analysis : An example involving behavioral and nutrition treatment for young children with cystic fibrosis. In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology. 2006 ; Vol. 31, No. 6. pp. 574-581.
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