Examining speech motor planning difficulties in apraxia of speech and aphasia via the sequential production of phonetically similar words

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigated the underlying nature of apraxia of speech (AOS) by testing two competing hypotheses. The Reduced Buffer Capacity Hypothesis argues that people with AOS can plan speech only one syllable at a time Rogers and Storkel [1999. Planning speech one syllable at a time: The reduced buffer capacity hypothesis in apraxia of speech. Aphasiology, 13(9–11), 793–805. https://doi.org/10.1080/026870399401885]. The Program Retrieval Deficit Hypothesis states that selecting a motor programme is difficult in face of competition from other simultaneously activated programmes Mailend and Maas [2013. Speech motor programming in apraxia of speech: Evidence from a delayed picture-word interference task. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 22(2), S380–S396. https://doi.org/10.1044/1058-0360(2013/12-0101)]. Speakers with AOS and aphasia, aphasia without AOS, and unimpaired controls were asked to prepare and hold a two-word utterance until a go-signal prompted a spoken response. Phonetic similarity between target words was manipulated. Speakers with AOS had longer reaction times in conditions with two similar words compared to two identical words. The Control and the Aphasia group did not show this effect. These results suggest that speakers with AOS need additional processing time to retrieve target words when multiple motor programmes are simultaneously activated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-87
Number of pages16
JournalCognitive Neuropsychology
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Apraxia of speech
  • aphasia
  • language production
  • reaction time
  • speech motor planning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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