Examining the presence, consequences, and reduction of implicit bias in health care

A narrative review

Colin A. Zestcott, Irene V. Blair, Jeffrey A Stone

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that one possible cause of disparities in health outcomes for stigmatized groups is the implicit biases held by health care providers. In response, several health care organizations have called for, and developed, new training in implicit bias for their providers. This review examines current evidence on the role that provider implicit bias may play in health disparities, and whether training in implicit bias can effectively reduce the biases that providers exhibit. Directions for future research on the presence and consequences of provider implicit bias, and best practices for training to reduce such bias, will be discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)528-542
Number of pages15
JournalGroup Processes and Intergroup Relations
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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Keywords

  • bias reduction
  • health care
  • health disparities
  • implicit bias

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Communication
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Examining the presence, consequences, and reduction of implicit bias in health care : A narrative review. / Zestcott, Colin A.; Blair, Irene V.; Stone, Jeffrey A.

In: Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.07.2016, p. 528-542.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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