Examining the quality of social support messages produced face-to-face and in computer-mediated communication: The effects of hyperpersonal communication

Stephen A Rains, Chelsie Akers, Corey A. Pavlich, Eric Tsetsi, Michael Appelbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The hyperpersonal communication model was used to investigate the implications of the reduced social cues in computer-mediated communication (CMC) for the production of social support messages. Participants were randomly assigned to interact with a confederate seeking help about a problem for which the confederate was or was not responsible. The interactions took place either face-to-face or in one of two CMC conditions. The results were partially consistent with the intensification effect proposed in the hyperpersonal model. Participants evaluated the confederate most negatively, but produced the highest quality support messages, in the CMC condition with visual anonymity followed by the CMC condition and face-to-face condition. Participants’ evaluations of the confederate were also influenced by the confederate’s responsibility for their problem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCommunication Monographs
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Computer-mediated communication
  • hyperpersonal communication
  • person-centeredness
  • social support
  • support provision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

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