Excessive drinking in college: Behavioral outcome, not binge, as a basis for prevention

Eric N. Alexander, Anne Markey Bowen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dichotomous variable "binge drinking" and its associated outcomes may be insufficient for understanding the drinking phenomenon on college campuses. The current study examined the behavioral outcomes associated with different drinking nights (light, typical, and heavy) in an effort to more closely examine collegiate drinking behavior. Data were collected from 236 university students, including hourly drinking rate, estimated blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was computed, and outcomes for each drinking night. Students reported drinking behavior that ranged from weekly "light night" drinking (average: 2.85 drinks, 3.34 h, end of night BAC=0.04%) to biweekly "heavy nights" (average: 9.91 drinks, 4.93 h, end of night BAC=0.25%). Students report encountering the greatest number of negative outcomes during heavy drinking nights, while light nights were found to have the fewest associated negative outcomes. Positive outcomes were highest on "typical" nights, although effect sizes were small. These data suggest that prevention efforts may be more successful if types of drinking night and positive outcomes become a stronger focus. Limitations and directions for future programming and research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1199-1205
Number of pages7
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Drinking
Blood
Alcohols
Students
Drinking Behavior
Light
Binge Drinking
Alcohol Drinking in College
Research
Blood Alcohol Content
Direction compound

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Behavior
  • Binge
  • College
  • Drinking
  • Student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Excessive drinking in college : Behavioral outcome, not binge, as a basis for prevention. / Alexander, Eric N.; Bowen, Anne Markey.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 29, No. 6, 08.2004, p. 1199-1205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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