Exhaled breath condensate detects baseline reductions in chloride and increases in response to albuterol in cystic fibrosis patients

Courtney M. Wheatley, Wayne J Morgan, Nicholas A. Cassuto, William T. Foxx-Lupo, Cori L Daines, Mary A. Morgan, Hanna Phan, Eric M. Snyder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Impaired ion regulation and dehydration is the primary pathophysiology in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. A potential application of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) collection is to assess airway surface liquid ionic composition at baseline and in response to pharmacological therapy in CF. Our aims were to determine if EBC could detect differences in ion regulation between CF and healthy and measure the efect of the albuterol on EBC ions in these populations. Baseline EBC Cl-, DLCO and SpO2 were lower in CF (n = 16) compared to healthy participants (n = 16). EBC Cl- increased in CF subjects, while there was no change in DLCO or membrane conductance, but a decrease in pulmonary-capillary blood volume in both groups following albuterol. This resulted in an improvement in diffusion at the alveolar-capillary unit, and removal of the baseline difference in SpO2 by 90-minutes in CF subjects. These results demonstrate that EBC detects differences in ion regulation between healthy and CF individuals, and that albuterol mediates increases in Cl- in CF, suggesting that the benefits of albuterol extend beyond simple bronchodilation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-90
Number of pages12
JournalClinical Medicine Insights: Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 10 2013

Fingerprint

Albuterol
Cystic Fibrosis
Chlorides
Ions
Ionic Liquids
Blood Volume
Dehydration
Lung Diseases
Healthy Volunteers
Pharmacology
Lung
Membranes

Keywords

  • Diffusion capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide and nitric oxide (DLCO/DLNO)
  • Exhaled chloride
  • Exhaled sodium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Exhaled breath condensate detects baseline reductions in chloride and increases in response to albuterol in cystic fibrosis patients. / Wheatley, Courtney M.; Morgan, Wayne J; Cassuto, Nicholas A.; Foxx-Lupo, William T.; Daines, Cori L; Morgan, Mary A.; Phan, Hanna; Snyder, Eric M.

In: Clinical Medicine Insights: Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine, Vol. 7, No. 1, 10.12.2013, p. 79-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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