Exogenous trehalose alters Arabidopsis transcripts involved in cell wall modification, abiotic stress, nitrogen metabolism, and plant defense

Hanhong Bae, Eliot M Herman, Bryan Bailey, Hyeun Jong Bae, Richard Sicher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Trehalose exists in most living organisms and functions as a storage carbohydrate and as an osmoprotectant in yeast, fungi, and bacteria. Trace amount of endogenous trehalose was detected in flowering plants, and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway was essential for embryo maturation in Arabidopsis. Conversely, exogenous trehalose was toxic to higher plants and severely curtailed root and shoot growth. In the current study, 30 mM trehalose was added to 2-week-old liquid cultures containing Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia ecotype) seedlings. Densely stained granular particles were detected in the extracellular space of cotyledons and roots of trehalose-treated seedlings using transmission electron microscopy. Expression levels of 91 transcripts were altered by 1-6 h of trehalose treatment using DNA microarray analysis, and 65 of these encoded either known proteins or putative proteins with known functions. The exogenous trehalose treatment altered transcript levels of transcription factors, cell wall modification, nitrogen metabolism, and stress-related, defense-related, and fatty acid biosynthesis genes. Many of the transcripts altered by exogenous trehalose treatment were associated with the ethylene and methyl jasmonate-signaling pathways. The above findings suggested that trehalose, or metabolites derived from trehalose, are important regulators of plant gene expression in higher plants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)114-126
Number of pages13
JournalPhysiologia Plantarum
Volume125
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Trehalose
nitrogen metabolism
trehalose
Arabidopsis
Cell Wall
abiotic stress
Nitrogen
cell walls
Seedlings
Ecotype
osmotolerance
Plant Genes
seedlings
Cotyledon
extracellular space
Poisons
Biosynthetic Pathways
methyl jasmonate
Extracellular Space
Regulator Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Exogenous trehalose alters Arabidopsis transcripts involved in cell wall modification, abiotic stress, nitrogen metabolism, and plant defense. / Bae, Hanhong; Herman, Eliot M; Bailey, Bryan; Bae, Hyeun Jong; Sicher, Richard.

In: Physiologia Plantarum, Vol. 125, No. 1, 09.2005, p. 114-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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