Experience theory, or how desserts are like losses

Jolie M. Martin, Martin C Reimann, Michael I. Norton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although many experiments have explored risk preferences for money, few have systematically assessed risk preferences for everyday experiences. we propose a conceptual model and provide convergent evidence from 7 experiments to suggest that, in contrast to a typical "zero" reference point for choices on money, reference points for choices of experiences are set at more extreme outcomes, leading to concave utility for negative experiences but convex utility for positive experiences. as a result, people are more risk-averse for negative experiences such as disgusting foods-as for monetary gains-but more risk-seeking for positive experiences such as desserts-as for monetary losses. these risk preferences for experiences are robust to different methods of elicitation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1460-1472
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: General
Volume145
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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Risk Preferences
Food
Experiment
Conceptual Model

Keywords

  • Experience theory
  • Experiences
  • Money
  • Prospect theory
  • Risk preferences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Experience theory, or how desserts are like losses. / Martin, Jolie M.; Reimann, Martin C; Norton, Michael I.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Vol. 145, No. 11, 01.11.2016, p. 1460-1472.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin, Jolie M. ; Reimann, Martin C ; Norton, Michael I. / Experience theory, or how desserts are like losses. In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. 2016 ; Vol. 145, No. 11. pp. 1460-1472.
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