Experimental study on drag-reducing channel flow with surfactant additives-Spatial structure of turbulence investigated by PIV system

Yasuo Kawaguchi, Takehiko Segawa, Ziping Feng, Peiwen Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The turbulent frictional drag of water can be reduced dramatically by adding small amounts of drag-reducing materials, such as polymers or surfactants. As a percentage drag reduction of 80% can easily be achieved, this technique is thought to be the most practical method of reducing turbulent frictional drag. In this work, a double pulse particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to clarify the spatial velocity distribution of surfactant solution flow in a two-dimensional channel. A type of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (C16H33N(CH3)3Cl) mixed with the same weight of counter-ion material NaSal (HOC6H4COONa) was used as a drag-reducing additive to water at a mass concentration of 40 ppm. Instantaneous velocity distribution taken by PIV was examined to clarify the effect of surfactant. It was found that the instantaneous velocity distribution taken in water flow exhibits penetration from the low-speed fluid region into the high-speed region, which is one of the important events of turbulence energy production and turbulent mixing. Although this structure is commonly observed in water flow, it was not found in drag-reducing flow under the same Reynolds number. The strong vorticity fluctuation near the wall also disappeared and the integral length scale in streamwise direction of turbulent fluctuation had a smaller value in surfactant solution flow.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)700-709
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Heat and Fluid Flow
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

channel flow
Channel flow
particle image velocimetry
Surface-Active Agents
Velocity measurement
drag
Drag
Turbulence
Surface active agents
turbulence
surfactants
Velocity distribution
Water
velocity distribution
water flow
Ammonium Chloride
drag reduction
ammonium chlorides
turbulent mixing
Radiation counters

Keywords

  • Channel flow
  • Drag reduction
  • PIV
  • Spatial structure
  • Surfactant
  • Turbulence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Experimental study on drag-reducing channel flow with surfactant additives-Spatial structure of turbulence investigated by PIV system. / Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Segawa, Takehiko; Feng, Ziping; Li, Peiwen.

In: International Journal of Heat and Fluid Flow, Vol. 23, No. 5, 10.2002, p. 700-709.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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