Experiments in macaque monkeys provide critical insights into age-associated changes in cognitive and sensory function

Daniel T. Gray, Carol A. Barnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of animal models in brain aging research has led to numerous fundamental insights into the neurobiological processes that underlie changes in brain function associated with normative aging. Macaque monkeys have become the predominant nonhuman primate model system in brain aging research due to their striking similarities to humans in their behavioral capacities, sensory processing abilities, and brain architecture. Recent public concern about nonhuman primate research has made it imperative to attempt to clearly articulate the potential benefits to human health that this model enables. The present review will highlight how nonhuman primates provide a critical bridge between experiments conducted in rodents and development of therapeutics for humans. Several studies discussed here exemplify how nonhuman primate research has enriched our understanding of cognitive and sensory decline in the aging brain, as well as how this work has been important for translating mechanistic implications derived from experiments conducted in rodents to human brain aging research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26247-26254
Number of pages8
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume116
Issue number52
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 26 2019

Keywords

  • Cognitive aging
  • Nonhuman primates
  • Presbycusis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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