Expressed emotion and sociocultural moderation in the course of schizophrenia

Adrian Aguilera, Steven R. López, Nicholas J.K. Breitborde, Alex Kopelowicz, Roberto Zarate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined whether the sociocultural context moderates the relationship between families' expressed emotion (EE) and clinical outcomes in schizophrenia. In a sample of 60 Mexican American caregivers and their ill relatives, we first assessed whether EE and its indices (criticism, emotional overinvolvement [EOI], and warmth) related to relapse. Second, we extended the analysis of EE and its indices to a longitudinal assessment of symptomatology. Last, we tested whether bidimensional acculturation moderated the relationship between EE (and its indices) and both relapse and symptom trajectory over time. Results indicated that EOI was associated with increased relapse and that criticism was associated with increased symptomatology. Additionally, as patients' Mexican enculturation (Spanish language and media involvement) decreased, EE was increasingly related to relapse. For symptomatology, as patients' U.S. acculturation (English language and media involvement) increased, EE was associated with increased symptoms longitudinally. Our results replicate and extend past research on how culture might shape the way family factors relate to the course of schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)875-885
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume119
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Enculturation
  • Expressed emotion
  • Mexican Americans
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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