Expression of an evolutionarily conserved function associated molecule on sheep, horse and cattle natural killer cells

David T. Harris, Todd D Camenisch, Liliana Jaso-Friedmann, Donald L. Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Natural killer (NK) cells are large granular lymphocytes that lyse a wide variety of transformed and virally-infected target cells without prior exposure to antigen, and without restriction by major histocompatability complex antigens. Although NK cells have been identified in a variety of mammalian species, how NK cells recognize antigen and trigger lysis is unknown. Recently, monoclonal antibodies made against NK-like cells from teleost fish were shown to react with NK cells from humans and rats, and to inhibit their cytolytic activity. The role of this apparently evolutionarily conserved function-associated molecule (FAM) has been further investigated utilizing a variety of domesticated farm animal species. It was observed that the anti-FAM mAb reacted specifically with peripheral blood lymphocytes isolated from sheep, horses and cattle. Further, the anti-FAM mAb inhibited NK cell lytic activity in each of these species. Finally, the anti-FAM mAb was found to inhibit conjugate formation between NK and target cells, implying that the FAM was involved in antigen recognition by NK cells in each of these species. In conclusion, it appears that NK cell function is mediated by an evolutionarily conserved FAM in a wide variety of species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-282
Number of pages10
JournalVeterinary Immunology and Immunopathology
Volume38
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

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natural killer cells
Natural Killer Cells
Horses
Sheep
horses
sheep
cattle
antigens
Antigens
Domestic Animals
lymphocytes
Lymphocytes
cells
farmed animal species
monoclonal antibodies
Fishes
Monoclonal Antibodies
rats
blood
fish

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Immunology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Expression of an evolutionarily conserved function associated molecule on sheep, horse and cattle natural killer cells. / Harris, David T.; Camenisch, Todd D; Jaso-Friedmann, Liliana; Evans, Donald L.

In: Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology, Vol. 38, No. 3-4, 1993, p. 273-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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