Extensions to media richness theory: a test of the task-media fit hypothesis

Joseph S Valacich, Brian E. Mennecke, Renee M. Wachter, Bradley C. Wheeler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The richness of the communication environment and the type of task performed by dyads was contrasted in a laboratory experiment. Dyads communicated using face-to-face, video phone, telephone, and synchronous computer-mediated communication. One task was an intellective task while the other was a value-laden cognitive conflict task (McGrath, 1984). For the intellective task, subjects were given different information (i.e., one subject received a directory from the yellow pages and the other a city map) and asked to locate the closest doctor's office listed in the yellow pages directory to a location marked on the map. For the value laden task, subjects were asked to allocate limited funds to one or more of six controversial social causes. The results of this study help to provide theoretical extensions to normative views of media richness theory by discussing how variations in task processes may act to mediate both perceptions and performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
EditorsJay F. Nunamaker, Ralph H.Jr. Sprague
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages11-20
Number of pages10
Volume4
ISBN (Print)081865080X
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 27th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-27). Part 4 (of 5) - Wailea, HI, USA
Duration: Jan 4 1994Jan 7 1994

Other

OtherProceedings of the 27th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-27). Part 4 (of 5)
CityWailea, HI, USA
Period1/4/941/7/94

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Communication
Telephone
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Valacich, J. S., Mennecke, B. E., Wachter, R. M., & Wheeler, B. C. (1994). Extensions to media richness theory: a test of the task-media fit hypothesis. In J. F. Nunamaker, & R. H. J. Sprague (Eds.), Proceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (Vol. 4, pp. 11-20). Publ by IEEE.

Extensions to media richness theory : a test of the task-media fit hypothesis. / Valacich, Joseph S; Mennecke, Brian E.; Wachter, Renee M.; Wheeler, Bradley C.

Proceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. ed. / Jay F. Nunamaker; Ralph H.Jr. Sprague. Vol. 4 Publ by IEEE, 1994. p. 11-20.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Valacich, JS, Mennecke, BE, Wachter, RM & Wheeler, BC 1994, Extensions to media richness theory: a test of the task-media fit hypothesis. in JF Nunamaker & RHJ Sprague (eds), Proceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. vol. 4, Publ by IEEE, pp. 11-20, Proceedings of the 27th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS-27). Part 4 (of 5), Wailea, HI, USA, 1/4/94.
Valacich JS, Mennecke BE, Wachter RM, Wheeler BC. Extensions to media richness theory: a test of the task-media fit hypothesis. In Nunamaker JF, Sprague RHJ, editors, Proceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. Vol. 4. Publ by IEEE. 1994. p. 11-20
Valacich, Joseph S ; Mennecke, Brian E. ; Wachter, Renee M. ; Wheeler, Bradley C. / Extensions to media richness theory : a test of the task-media fit hypothesis. Proceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. editor / Jay F. Nunamaker ; Ralph H.Jr. Sprague. Vol. 4 Publ by IEEE, 1994. pp. 11-20
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