Facial Muscle Activity During Induced Mood Stales: Differential Growth and Carry‐Over of Elated Versus Depressed Patterns

Alan D. Sirota, Gary E. Schwartz, Jean L. Kristeller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two groups of 14 women volunteers each read a standard set of 40 self‐referent statements and engaged in imagery designed to induce moods of either elation or depression. Subjective ratings of emotion and facial muscle activity constituted the dependent measures. Feelings of depression as well as anger and sadness grew over time for Depression subjects, white feelings of happiness increased for Elation subjects. Elation led to increased zygomatic muscle activity while depression led to enhanced corrugator activity and slightly decreased zygomatic activity. Facial muscle activity was correlated with subjective ratings primarily for Depression subjects. For these subjects, corrugator activity grew over time and carried over into non‐imagery rest periods. In contrast, the increased zygomatic activity of Elation subjects returned to baseline during rest periods. The differential growth and carry‐over effects of the two mood states are discussed in terms of a positive psychobiological feedback loop which may serve to perpetuate depressive patterns of cognitive as well as somatic activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)691-699
Number of pages9
JournalPSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1987
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Electromyography
  • Emotion
  • Facial muscles
  • Imagery
  • Mood states

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry

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